Week ahead: A big week for the US economy

Week Ahead

Another busy week in the world of finance is ahead. Top topics this week include US economic indicators advanced GDP readings for Q3 and September’s core PCE data. On the central bank front, the ECB and Bank of Canada speak as markets speculate on potential rate hikes. Earnings season rolls on too with the busiest week of the quarter so far. 

US recovery in focus with Q3 GDP and Core PCE prints 

Inflation has been the hot button issue in global and American economics for most of the year. It’s taken on an extra level of importance as economies begin to transition out of the pandemic. 

The Fed’s favourite inflation indicator, the Core PCE index, is released on Friday, gauging consumer good inflation for September. 

August showed a 0.4% increase in personal consumption expenditure, which was broadly in line with expectations. Stripping out food and energy, then core PCE inflation stood at 0.3% in the last month. It was up 3.6% year-on-year in August too. 

Official advice from the Fed is that any price jumps are temporary. They might have a point. Monthly PCE gains have basically halved since April’s 0.6% surge. Other indicators, such as the slowing rate of consumer price index growth, back up this claim. 

Another key metric in the US’ economic recovery is released this week. Quarterly advanced GDP figures for Q3 will be published on Thursday. The Fed and the White House will no doubt be hoping growth will come in above expectations after a disappointing second quarter. 

Q2 GDP figures initially showed the US gross domestic product expanded 6.3%, although this has been revised up for a final reading of 6.7%. Dow Jones had forecast growth of 8.2% in the second quarter. 

Predictions for Q3 2021 are mixed to say the least. The Atalanta Fed, previously forecasting around 5.7% growth, has slashed its predicted third quarter growth down to just 0.5%.  

Goldman Sachs is a lot more optimistic but has still dropped its predicted growth forecast. Goldman had previously forecast 6.2% growth in the third quarter. Now, the level is more like 5.7%. 

Sticking with Goldman, the bank cites soft jobs reports and the impact of the Delta variant as reasons for slowing growth. Realistically, US GDP was always going to slow as the economy reaches some semblance of pre-pandemic normality.  

Central bank watch: ECB and Bank of Canada speak this week 

The European Central Bank seems like it’s in a bit of a pickle, if reports are to be believed. According to a Deutsche Bank survey of 600 investors, 42% expect the ECB to remain too dovish for too long. 

Andrea Enria, Chair of the ECB’s advisory board, said that caution is still the watchword, despite indicating that the European Union’s economic outlook is brightening.  

Unpublished internal models suggest inflation could reach the ECB’s illusive 2% target by 2025. Based on these, then rates may rise earlier than expected. Some investors have started to price in higher rates at the start of 2023.  

ECB policymaker Pablo Hernandez De Cos says no rate hike is on the way just yet. He doesn’t foresee any changes to the bank’s base rate until 2023 at the earliest. Some investors may have already started to price this in.  

This might cause problems for some Southern European states who, according to Markus Frühauf of Germany daily Fez, are unable to afford to hold rates low for much longer. 

Is a credibility crisis brewing for the European Central Bank? The inflationary surge is allegedly impacting poorer EU constituents than richer states. Independent central banks, like the Fed or Bank of England, have the luxury of being able to essentially look out for themselves, rather than toe the financial line drawn by Brussels. 

It will be interesting to see how the Bank handles these challenges, and indeed if any indication of a rate change, will happen at Wednesday’s ECB press conference. 

Speaking of early interest rate hikes, the Bank of Canada could possibly be lining one up. We’ll know more about the BoC’s stance on Wednesday, but economists believe April is when we’ll see things change in the Great White North. 

David Wolf of Fidelity and a former advisor to the Bank of Canada believes we’ll see the rate hike then. Strong job reports and hot inflation – currently sitting at double the BoC’s 2% target – may force Governor Tiff Macklem’s hand. 

Wells Fargo also thinks we’ll see Canadian rate movement next year. 

“We also expect the Bank of Canada to begin raising its policy interest rates in 2022, starting with an initial 25 bps rate increase to 0.50% at the July 2022 monetary policy meeting and another 25 bps rate increase during Q4-2022,” the investment bank said in a statement. “Regarding the initial rate hike, we believe the risks are tilted towards an earlier rather than later increase. We also see multiple rate hikes in 2023 and anticipate a cumulative 75 bps of tightening during that year.” 

Hawkish voices are calling for a rate adjustment. Let’s see what the Bank of Canada has to say this week. 

A bumper week ahead for earnings 

Don’t forget that it’s still earnings season on Wall Street. This week should be the busiest five reporting dates for the quarter ahead, with many large tech firms reporting in. 

Watch for Amazon, Apple, Twitter, Facebook, and Spotify are amongst the big technology companies reporting this week. We’ll also see many FMCG businesses reporting too, such as Coca-Cola. 

For more information on which companies are reporting and when be sure to check out our US earnings season calendar. 

Major economic data 

Date  Time (GMT+1)  Asset  Event 
Mon 25-Oct  9:00am  EUR  German ifo Business Climate 
       
Tue 26-Oct  3:00pm  USD  CB Consumer Confidence 
  3:00pm  USD  Richmond Manufacturing Index 
Wed 27-Oct  1:30am  AUD  CPI q/q 
  1:30pm  AUD  Trimmed Mean CPI q/q 
  1:30pm  USD  Core Durable Goods Orders m/m 
  1:30pm  USD  Durable Goods Orders m/m 
  3:00pm  CAD  BOC Monetary Policy Report 
  3:00pm  CAD  BOC Rate Statement 
  3:30pm  CAD  Overnight Rate 
  3:30pm  OIL  US Crude Oil Inventories 
  Tentative  CAD  BOC Press Conference 
       
Thu 28-Oct  Tentative  JPY  BOJ Outlook Report 
  Tentative  JPY  Monetary Policy Statement 
  Tentative  JPY  BOJ Press Conference 
  12:45pm  EUR  Monetary Policy Statement 
  12:45pm  EUR  Main Refinancing Rate 
  1:30pm  EUR  ECB Press Conference 
  1:30pm  USD  Advance GDP q/q 
  1:30pm  USD  Advance GDP Price Index q/q 
  1:30pm  USD  Unemployment Claims 
  3:00pm  USD  Pending Home Sales m/m 
  3.30pm  GAS  US Natural Gas Inventories 
       
Fri 29-Oct  9:00am  EUR  German Prelim GDP q/q 
  1:30pm  CAD  GDP m/m 
  1:30pm  USD  Core PCE Price Index m/m 
  2:45pm  USD  Chicago PMI 
  3:00pm  USD  Revised UoM Consumer Sentiment 

 

Key earnings data 

Mon 25 Oct  Tue 26 Oct  Wed 27 Oct  Thu 28 Oct  Fri 29 Oct 
  3M Co (MMM)  Automatic Data Processing (ADP)  Caterpillar Inc (CAT)   AbbVie (ABBV)  
  General Electric (GE)   Boeing (BA)  Keurig Dr Pepper (KDP)   Alibaba (BABA)  
  Advanced Micro Devices (AMD)  CME Group (CME)  Mastercard (MA)   Aon (AON) 
  Alphabet Inc C (GOOG)  Coca-Cola Co (KO)  Merck & Co Inc (MRK)   Chevron (CVX)  
  Alphabet Inc A (GOOGL)  General Motors (GM)   Newmont Goldcorp (NEM)   Exxon Mobil (XOM)  
Facebook (FB)  Microsoft Corp (MSFT)  The Kraft Heinz Co (KHC)   Shopify (SHOP)   Berkshire Hathaway (BRK.B) 
  QuantumScape (QS)  McDonald’s Corp (MCD)   Takeda Pharmaceutical (TAK)    
  Twitter Inc (TWTR)  Spotify Technology SA (SPOT)   Amazon.com Inc (AMZN)    
  Visa Inc Class A (V)   Ford Motor Co (F)   Apple Inc (AAPL)    
    Pinterest (PINS)  Gilead Sciences Inc (GILD)    
    Teladoc Health (TDOC)  Starbucks Corp (SBUX)    
    Twilio (TWLO)     

Week Ahead: Is hot UK inflation here to stay?

Week Ahead

Quite a lot to look out for in terms of big data this week. First up, we have UK CPI data. Is inflation sticking around for longer than we thought? UK and EU flash PMIs come too at a time when it looks like economic activity is starting to slow down. It’s also US earnings season with leading tech players reporting in. 

UK CPI: circling hawks and hot prints 

On the data front, one of the week’s big releases are the latest UK Consumer Price Index numbers. 

September’s print showed that UK inflation had far exceeded the Bank of England’s 2% target in August. Consumer prices surged by 3.2% in the twelve months up to that month official data showed – the highest month-on-month increase since records began in 2017. 

The Office for National Statistics said the surge was “likely to be a temporary change” and flagged the government’s Eat Out to Help Out (EOHO) scheme may have been a contributing factor to the jump. 

“In August 2020 many prices in restaurants and cafes were discounted because of the government’s Eat Out to Help Out scheme, which offered customers half-price food and drink to eat or drink in (up to the value of £10) between Mondays and Wednesdays,” the ONS said in its statement. 

“Because EOHO was a short-term scheme, the upward shift in the August 2021 12-month inflation rate is likely to be temporary.” 

The official line has been that higher prices are transitionary – but voices from within the Bank of England warn it could be here for longer than first thought.  

The BoE’s new Chief Economist Huw Pill has said he believes hot inflation could be sticking around. 

“In my view, that balance of risks is currently shifting towards great concerns about the inflation outlook, as the current strength of inflation looks set to prove more long-lasting than originally anticipated,” Pill said in September. 

Pill lends his voice to the hawkish chorus steadily building in the Bank of England’s council. A number of MPC members are calling for a rate hike early next year. As such, another high CPI print in September may lead to a turning up of the volume from the hawks. 

PMI rush to signpost economic slowdowns? 

It’s also the time of the month when flash PMI scores start landing thick and fast. 

British and EU data is released this week off the back of last month’s reports which indicate growth is slowing in these two major economies. 

Let’s start with the UK. The IHS Markit flash composite for September indicated output had dropped to the lowest level since February. The UK’s score came in at 54.1 that month, slipping from 54.8 in August. 

Recovery appears to be stalling as we head into the winter months. Lower economic activity matched with higher inflation does not create the most positive of outcomes for Britain’s economy going forward.  

The PMI for the services sector fell to 54.6 in September from 55.0 in August, its lowest level since February when Britain was still in lockdown. Manufacturing fell from 60.3 to 56.4, which is again the lowest level since February. 

It’s the same story across the Channel. European growth was stymied by supply constraints pushing input costs the 20-year highs throughout the EU last month. Will this month’s PMI data show the same? 

In terms of scores, the IHS composite reading showed economic growth had dropped to a five-month low in September. The EU scored 56.1 that month against 59.0 in August. 

This was well below market forecasts. A Reuters poll indicated economists and analysts believed output would slow, but at the much lower rate of 58.5. 

Supply line squeezes coupled with a general slowing of GDP growth appear to be the main factors here. The EU economy is approaching its pre-pandemic size, so a slowdown was always on the cards, but not one quite so drastic. 

I would expect to see a lower EU PMI print on Friday when the latest data lands. 

Wall Street earnings keep on coming – enter the tech stocks 

Next week, we’ll be in the thick of it when it comes to Q3 earnings season. Big banks, including Goldman Sachs, Citigroup, and JPMorgan, kicked things off for us last week. Now, it’s the turn of some big tech mega caps to share their latest financials. 

Netflix and Tesla are the two headliners to watch out for this week. Both reported strong Q1 and Q2 figures but have advised performance may start to drop off in 2021’s third quarter. 

For more information on which companies are reporting and when be sure to check out our US earnings season calendar. 

Major economic data 

Date  Time (GMT+1)  Asset  Event 
Mon 18-Oct  3:00am  CNY  GDP q/y 
  3:00am  CNY  Retail Sales y/y 
  2:15pm  USD  Industrial Production m/m 
  3:30pm  CAD  BOC Business Outlook Survey 
Tue 19-Oct   1:30am  AUD  Monetary Policy Meeting Minutes 
       
Wed 20-Oct  7:00am  GBP  CPI y/y 
  1:30pm  CAD  CPI m/m 
  1:30pm  CAD  Common CPI y/y 
  1:30pm  CAD  Median CPI y/y 
  1:30pm  CAD  Trimmed CPI y/y 
  3:30pm  USD  Crude Oil Inventories 
       
Thu 21-Oct  1:30pm  USD  Philly Fed Manufacturing Index 
    USD  Unemployment Claims 
       
Fri 22-Oct  7:00am  GBP  Retail Sales m/m 
  8:15am  EUR  French Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  8:15am  EUR  French Flash Services PMI 
  8:30am  EUR  German Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  8:30am  EUR  German Flash Services PMI 
  9:00am  EUR  Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  9:00am  EUR  Flash Services PMI 
  9:30am  GBP  Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  9:30am  GBP  Flash Services PMI 
  1:30pm  CAD  Core Retail Sales m/m 
  1:30pm  CAD  Retail Sales m/m 
  2:45pm  USD  Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  2:45pm  USD  Flash Services PMI 
  Tentative  USD  Treasury Currency Report 

 

Key earnings data 

Tue 19 Oct  Wed 20 Oct  Thu 21 Oct  Fri 22 Oct 
Philip Morris International (PM)   Verizon Communications Inc (VZ)   AT&T (T)   American Express (AXP)  
       
Johnson & Johnson (JNJ)   International Business Machines (IBM)  Intel Corp (INTC)   Schlumberger Ltd (SLB)  
       
Procter & Gamble (PG)  Tesla Inc (TSLA)   Snap Inc A (SNAP)    
       
Netflix Inc (NFLX)        

 

Week Ahead: Prepare for the Q3 earnings blitz

Week Ahead

Wall Street will be alive with the sound of incoming earnings reports when Q3 earnings season kicks off in earnest this week. On the data side, we get US CPI data plus a look under the Fed hood with the latest FOMC meeting notes.  

Key inflation metric with US CPI report 

First up is Wednesday’s Consumer Price Index report, gauging inflation in the US. 

Following September’s release of August’s numbers, Jerome Powell and his colleagues are sticking to the script: that all this high inflation is simply transitionary. Will Wednesday’s data back this view up? 

For context, the last CPI report published in September showed things had cooled a little in August. Underlying prices rose at their slowest rate for six months up to then. Overall CPI rose 0.3% after gaining 0.5% in July. In the 12 months through August, CPI increased 5.3% after soaring 5.4% year-on-year in July. 

Some Fed members are not worried though. 

“I’m comfortable in thinking that these are elevated prices, that they will be coming down as supply bottlenecks are addressed,” Chicago Fed President Charles Evans told CNBC. “I think it could be longer than we were expecting, absolutely, there’s no doubt about it. But I think the continuing increase in these prices is unlikely.” 

Fuel prices are on the rise though. Oil & gas skyrocketed across last week. Higher oil prices generally points towards higher input and transport costs across multiple sectors, which may then be lumped onto the consumer, resulting in higher prices across the board. That said, high energy costs and their knock on effects may be expressed more clearly in next month’s CPI print, rather than Wednesday’s. 

FOMC meeting minutes to give insights into Fed thinking 

Wednesday also sees the release of the FOMC’s meeting minutes for its September get together. 

We know the script now: rates to stay low; tapering to come soon. 

That said, we also know some of the more hawkish fed members are projecting earlier-than-anticipated rate hikes. There is a feeling that higher rates could come next year.  

Chairman Powell also added his voice to the chorus of those warning against failing to raise the debt ceiling. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen warned at the end of September the US government could run out of cash if action isn’t taken. 

Defaulting on US debt would cause “significant damage” to the US economy, according to Powell. President Biden has indicated that there is a real possibility for a debt hike, so the crisis may be averted.  

In terms of steering the economy, however, tapering is probably the big one. It’s thought that the Fed will remove support incrementally until it’s gone altogether by the end of 2022. 

It’s a strong sign that the US is aiming to get back to normal economic times quickly. But the threat of new COVID-19 variants still looms large. Let’s hope there’s not another new Delta forcing a fresh wave of lockdowns in 2022 or the Fed will be left holding the bag once again. 

Earnings season is here again 

Let’s head to Wall Street. Third-quarter earnings are about to start pouring in from the mega caps as earnings season begins anew this week.  

As ever, we’re kicking things off with the big investment banks who reported stunning growth numbers in Q2. Will the momentum roll on? JPMorgan, Wells Faro, Citigroup and Goldman Sachs, amongst others, will start the earnings ball rolling with the first report landing from JP landing on Wednesday. 

Although growth looks like it is slowing from Q2 2021’s bumper results, we could still be on for a high-performing quarter. US financial data group FactSet predicts S&P500 companies will enjoy Q3 earnings growth of 27.6% – the third highest year-on-year earnings growth rate reported by the index since 2010. 

There are also supply chain snags to contend with in Q3. They existed across the first half of the year, but with the prices of raw material and energy increasing, we may see a slowing down of results. 

Certainly, the likes of Apple warned that sales growth will drop off towards the end of the year, but let’s see what happens. 

Our US earnings season calendar will keep you up to date of which mega caps are reporting and when so you can plan your trades based on this quarter’s earnings reports. You’ll also a preview of companies reporting this week below. 

Major economic data 

Date  Time (GMT+1  Asset  Event 
Tue Oct-12  10:00am  EUR  ZEW Economic Sentiment 
  10:00am  EUR  German ZEW Economic Sentiment 
  3:00pm  USD  JOLTS Job Openings 
       
  6:01pm  USD  10-y Bond Auction 
Wed Oct-13  1:30pm  USD  CPI m/m 
  1:30pm  USD  Core CPI m/m 
  6:01pm  USD  30-y Bond Auction 
  7:00pm  USD  FOMC Meeting Minutes 
       
Thu Oct-14  1:30am  AUD  Employment Change 
  1:30am  AUD  Unemployment Rate 
  1:30pm  USD  PPI m/m 
  1:30pm  USD  Core PPI m/m 
  1:30pm  USD  Unemployment Claims 
  4:00pm  USD  Crude Oil Inventories 
       
Fri Oct-15  1:30pm  USD  Core Retail Sales m/m 
  1:30pm  USD  Retail Sales m/m 
  1:30pm  USD  Empire State Manufacturing Index 
  3:00pm  USD  Prelim UoM Consumer Sentiment 
  Tentative  USD  Treasury Currency Report 

 

Key earnings data 

Wed 13 Oct  Thu 14 Oct  Fri 15 Oct 
JPMorgan Chase & Co (JPM) PMO  Bank of America Corp (BAC) PMO  Goldman Sachs Group Inc (GS) PMO 
     
Wells Fargo & Co (WFC) E  Citigroup Inc (C) PMO  Goldman Sachs Group Inc (GS) PMO 
     
  Morgan Stanley (MS) PMO   

 

Week Ahead: Market pins hopes on strong NFP print

Morning Note

A new month brings a fresh nonfarm payrolls report. Markets will be hoping August’s big miss was just a fluke. Aussie and Kiwi central banks prep big statements too while OPEC+ gathers for its October policy talks. 

Tapering or no tapering, Friday’s nonfarm payrolls report is still a big one for the US. 

Markets will be looking to see if there’s a reversal of fortune in the American jobs market after August’s print fell way below expectations. NFPs totalled 275,000 for August, missing market expectations of 750,000 by a country mile. 

The unemployment rate had dropped a smidgen lower to 5.2% while labour force participation went unchanged at 61.7%. Hourly earnings rose 0.6% in August, surpassing market predictions of a 0.3% rise. 

We know that Jerome Powell and the Fed loves a strong jobs report. But we also know that regardless of September’s data tapering is on its way – likely in November. Of course, if this Friday’s report is truly shocking, that may cause a wrinkle in the Fed’s tapering plans, but all indicators suggest we’re on course for tapering soon. 

However, Fed Chair Powell still believes the US is still far from where he’d comfortably like employment to be. 

Speaking last week, Powell said: “What I said last week was that we had all but met the test for tapering. I made it clear that we are, in my view, a long way from meeting the test for maximum employment.” 

When will that come? According to a recent survey taken by the National Association for Business Economics, 67% of participating economists believe job levels will reach pre-pandemic levels by the end of 2022. Just under a third believe job recovery won’t happen until 2023. 

There is a long road to recovery still to tread. We have seen, however, multiple instances across 2021 where nonfarm payrolls jump after a previous disappointing month. 

The leap from January to February, for example, saw a leap from -306,000 NFPs to +233,000. Nonfarm payrolls rose from 269,000 to 614,000 between April and May 2021. There is a precedent here.  

More than 7.5m Americans have also had their pandemic unemployment support snipped. $300 top-up payments were halted in early September as the government begins scaling back fiscal aid. Could this be a catalyst for more hires? Perhaps we’ll see in Friday’s nonfarm payrolls print. 

Away from the US, both major Antipodean central banks are due to make their most current rate statements this week. 

Starting with Australia, Governor Phillip Lowe and his colleagues seemed to move towards a more flexible policy at September’s Reserve Bank of Australia meeting. As such, markets aren’t anticipating any drastic changes in October. 

We saw rates stay as low as they have past year and a half in Australia. The RBA remains committed to fully committed to not raising the cash rate “until actual inflation is sustainably within the 2 to 3 per cent target range”. 

September’s statement did reveal some nuanced changes. 

The cash rate and three-year control rate all remained at 0.1% but the bond-buying programme taper wording did get a tweak. Originally, it was going to be reviewed no later than November, having been dropped down to AU$ 4bn per week in July. Now, it will be kept at that level until at least February 2022. 

Basically, all this means is that the pace of RBA asset purchases isn’t going to slow until next February. After July’s meeting, it was thought that the Bank would begin reviewing bond-buying every three months before removing it altogether over the course of the year. That doesn’t look like the case just yet. 

Still, we’re not really expecting any fireworks when the RBA delivers its October rate statement on Tuesday morning. 

Markets may have anticipated more hawkish moves from the Reserve Bank of New Zealand instead – but recent comments from Assistant Governor Christian Hawksby suggest any talk of a major cash rate hike are premature. 

“Central banks globally tend to follow a smoothed path and keep their policy rate unchanged or move in 25 basis point increments,” Hawksby said, putting paid to any ideas of a 50 basis point upswing in New Zealand’s 0.25% cash rate. 

Instead, it is likely to follow an incremental path before taking rates up to 1.5% by the end of 2022. 

But, as ever, there is a big COVID-19 shadow looming over New Zealand fiscal policy. The country recently went back into lockdown after a rise in Delta variant cases. Although it’s starting to remerge once again, the small number of incidents may have been enough to give the RBNZ the jitters. 

According to Reuters, markets are pricing in a 60% chance of a rate hike on Wednesday when Governor Orr speaks. 

Finally, OPEC and allies meet once more for their monthly get together and policy bash on Monday. 

With prices high and demand along with them, we’ll probably see a rubber-stamping of more output to come. OPEC+ has committed to pumping an additional 400,000 bpd each month until the end of next year as it seeks to recover pandemic-induced losses. 

According to September’s Monthly Oil Market Report, OPEC+ believes demand will exceed 2019 levels by the end of 2022.  

With Brent crude nudging towards $80 at the time of writing, the US is sounding alarm bells over the price of gasoline. The US has historically enjoyed much cheaper petrol prices than some other developed nations and anything that challenges that is seen as unacceptable by Joe Sixpack and Joe Biden. 

The President said the US is currently in talks with OPEC about raising volumes further to cover this – perhaps ignoring the fact that US shale is ready to add at least 800,000 bpd to global supplies once it gets up and running. 

OPEC+ is very much its own creature anyway. Everything it does is in the interest of its member states, allies, and worldwide oil prices as a whole. Whether Biden’s pleas fall on deaf ears, we don’t quite know, but I wouldn’t be surprised to see OPEC-JMMC sticking to its own agenda in October and beyond. 

Major economic data 

Date  Time (GMT+1)  Asset  Event 
Mon 04-Oct  All Day  OIL  OPEC-JMMC Meetings 
       
Tue 05-Oct  4.30am  AUD  RBA Rate Statement 
  4.30am  AUD  Cash Rate 
  3.00pm  USD  ISM Services PMI 
       
Wed 06-Oct  2.00am  NZD  Official Cash Rate 
  2.00am  NZD  RBNZ Rate Statement 
  1.15pm  USD  ADP Nonfarm Employment Change 
  3.30pm  OIL  US Crude Oil Inventories 
       
Thu 07-Oct  3.30pm  GAS  US Natural Gas Inventories 
       
Fri 08-Oct  1.30pm  CAD  Employment Change 
  1.30pm  CAD  Unemployment Rate 
  1.30pm  USD  Average Hourly Earnings m/m 
  1.30pm  USD  Nonfarm Employment Change 
  1.30pm  USD  Unemployment Rate 
  Tentative  USD  Treasury Currency Report 

Week ahead: US PCE data to nudge Fed tapering?

Week Ahead

On the agenda this week: We bid farewell to Angela Merkel as Germany faces a future without her leadership for the first time in over a decade. We’ve also a range of big data releases from the US including the Fed’s preferred inflation metric – and Canadian GDP stats. Will it backslide again? 

We all know the Fed loves PCE data. Personal Consumption Expenditures is its favourite inflation metric – and one that could force that ever-discussed tapering through earlier, depending on August’s print. 

The broad market consensus is that the Fed will begin pulling back its economic support in either November or December, so the question now is one of liftoff for rates. The Fed has already raised its core CPE inflation forecast for 2021 to 3.7% from 3% in June – they know it’s hot. Chair Powell has also pretty much announced that the Fed will start tapering this year. The question now is whether the Fed has to revise these expectations still higher, and what that might mean for the path of interest rate hikes. An expectation-beating print this week would stoke concerns that this is the case. 

Of course, there are other external factors at play. It should also be pointed that July’s 0.4% jump was in line with expectations and showed a cooling off against June’s figures. 

In July, the overall rate of inflation reached 4.2%. Going by the Consumer Price Index data reported recently, the cost of consumer goods rose 5.3% in August. This was in line with expectations. It may also be an indicator of where PCE data is headed.  

The Fed is on record as saying its content to let inflation run above its 2% target as it considers the current high levels as “transitionary”.  

The United States, like pretty much all major economies, is moving out of the pandemic economy and attempting to find some semblance of normality. It could be the case that hot inflation continues to singe the economy before burning out in 2022 and fading away. 

The latest PCE reading comes on Friday. 

Tethered to this is US consumer confidence. Logically, higher prices suggest a lowering in consumer sentiment. This has been reflected in August’s data, and it may be the case when we get September’s data on Tuesday afternoon. 

In August, consumer confidence dropped to a six-month low. The Conference Board’s index fell to 113.8 from a revised 125.1 reading in July.  

“Concerns about the Delta variant — and, to a lesser degree, rising gas and food prices — resulted in a less favourable view of current economic conditions and short-term growth prospects,” Lynn Franco, senior director of economic indicators at the Conference Board, said in a statement, explaining the dip. 

Over 39 million COVID-19 cases have been recorded in the US across the course of the pandemic so far. 

Moving away from the US, Germany closes the book on Angela Merkel’s tenure as Chancellor. After 16 years, Merkel is stepping aside, which gives today’s elections an air of exciting new change. 

By the end of play today, Germany will have a brand-new Chancellor. SPD leader Olaf Scholz was the front runner in the build-up to election, outstripping rivals from the CDU and the Greens. 

That said, the belief is the Greens, who were on course to their best-ever results prior to Germans hitting the polls, may become the SPD’s chief partner in a brand-new coalition. 

Our macroeconomics and political guru Helen Thomas previewed Germany’s latest federal elections. Have her predictions been proved correct?  

Speaking of elections, Canadians recently voted in a fresh wave of political changes, with PM Trudeau holding onto the reins for a third term. The Liberals’ majority was compromised – which could make the nation’s economic moves interest. 

Canada’s month-on-month GDP figures are released this month, following a 1.1% contraction. Estimates called for 2.5% growth, so even with the snap election keeping Trudeau in power, the same challenges he was facing before are his same challenges once again. 

Economic recovery will “continue to require the same extraordinary level of support”, according to Bank of Canada Governor Tiff Macklem. No changes to economic policy are expected – despite the lacklustre GDP showing from last month. Perhaps we’ll see a reversal this month, or a possible muddying of the waters caused by election fervour.  

Major economic data 

Date  Time (GMT+1)  Asset  Event 
Sun 26-Sep  All Day  EUR  German Federal Elections 
       
Tue 28-Sep  2.30am  AUD  Core Retail Sales m/m 
  3.00pm  USD  CB Consumer Confidence 
       
Wed 29-Sep  3.30pm  OIL  US Crude Oil Inventories 
       
Thu 30-Sep  2.00am  CNH  China Manufacturing PMI 
  1.30pm  CAD  GDP m/m 
       
Fri 01-Oct  8.55am  EUR  German Final Manufactuing PMI 
  1.30pm  USD  Core PCE Index m/m 
  3.00pm  USD  ISM Manufacturing PMI 

 

Week Ahead: Central banks take centre stage

The week ahead is dominated by central bank statements. We’ve got three lined up, with the first coming from the ECB. Its dovish outlook runs counter to the Reserve Bank of Australia and Bank of Canada who’ve taken on a more hawkish character of late. We’re not expecting major policy shifts – but surprises are never far away in the world of economics. 

The last glimpse inside the European Central Bank’s thinking we got came in the form of its July meeting minutes. In a world where central banks are starting to take more hawkish footings, the ECB is still relatively dovish. 

The ECB announced its first major strategic financial policy in July. Inflation targets were revised away from trying to keep it below 2% by adopting a specific 2% headline inflation target. Since then, inflation in the Euro area has risen to a decade high of 3%, which is likely to encourage hawks on the Governing Council.  

All very well and good, but what about COVID-19? The pandemic is by no means over, but some key ECB board members are confident even the impact of the Delta variant can’t stunt Europe’s return to the black. 

Limited headwinds are expected. The sentiment is positive. 

“I would say we’re broadly not too far away from what we expected in June for the full year,” Philip Lane, the ECB’s chief economist, told Reuters on Wednesday. “It’s a reasonably well-balanced picture.” 

Importantly, the ECB has said it will keep a “persistently accommodative” stance going forward. Interest rates are likely to stay at their current exceptionally low levels. We’re not expecting to see a shift towards a more hawkish position any time soon. 

Moving to Australia, the RBA has been fairly bullish in its most recent communications. A new rate statement will come the Reserve Bank of Australia on Tuesday morning and we’re not expecting the bank to stray too far from its current course. 

That is to say, tapering of the RBA’s bond buying programme will continue with the aim of scaling it back from September onwards. Rates will probably stay low too. We’re not expecting a hike until late 2022 at the earliest. 

Much depends on how robust Australia’s economy fares in light of rising coronavirus cases and localised lockdowns.  

“The board would be prepared to act in response to further bad news on the health front should that lead to a more significant setback for the economic recovery,” the RBA said in its August meeting minutes. “Experience to date had been that, once virus outbreaks were contained, the economy bounced back quickly.” 

Governor Lowe and his colleagues have said a recession is not very likely, although growth prospects have been revised for 2021. This year, the RBA expects annual growth to be around 4%, lower than the 4.75% previously forecast, but will rise to 4.25% by the end of 2022. 

Rounding off the week’s cavalcade of central bank statements is the Bank of Canada. The BOC is one of the more hawkish of the world’s central banks and has moved towards bond-buying tapering quite quickly, even though it is holding its overnight rate at 0.25%. 

The BOC did point out that a fresh wave of infections and lockdowns in Q2 did inhibit growth, but the bank is confident growth will expand rapidly towards the end of the year.  

The central bank said Canada’s economy is now expected to grow 6.0% in 2021, down from the April forecast of 6.5%, while it revised up its 2022 growth estimate to 4.6% from 3.7%. 

Hot inflation is still floating in the air, with readings expected to stay at or above 3% through to 2022. Quite hot – and at the top of the BOC’s 1-3% range. However, the bank is confident this is all transitionary. It is unlikely to force a policy rethink. 

Major economic data 

Date  Time (GMT+1)  Asset  Event 
Tue 7-Sep  5.30am  AUD  RBA Rate Statement 
  5.30am  AUD  Cash Rate 
  10.00am  EUR  ZEW Economic Sentiment 
  10.00am  EUR  German ZEW Economic Sentiment 
       
Wed 8-Sep  3.00pm  CAD  BOC Rate Statement 
  3.00pm  CAD  Ivey PMI 
  3.00pm  CAD  Overnight Rate 
  Tentative  CAD  BOC Press Conference 
       
Thu 9-Sep  12.45pm  EUR  Monetary Policy Statement 
  12.45pm  EUR  Main Referencing Rate 
  1.30pm  EUR  ECB Press Conference 
  1.30pm  USD  Unemployment Claims 
  3.30pm  GAS  US Natural Gas Inventories 
  4.00pm  OIL  US Crude Oil Inventories 
       
Fri 10-Sep  1.30pm  CAD  Employment Change 
  1.30pm  CAD  Unemployment Rate 
  1.30pm  USD  PPI m/m 
  1.30pm  USD  Core PPI m/m 
  Tentative  GBP  Monetary Policy Hearings 

Week ahead: Nonfarm payrolls take the spotlight

Week Ahead

It’s all about major economic movers this week. The US jobs report for August is released on Friday, while we kick off the week with the latest Chinese manufacturing PMI numbers. OPEC and allies are due to hold meetings too, making it a busy week for the global economy. 

The US jobs market has taken us to abyssal lows and new dizzying growth heights across the past 18 months. The pandemic has certainly taken its toll, but we’ve seen new life flow through the US’ economic veins too with more workers filling job gaps. 

Just take last month’s nonfarm payrolls. July’s data saw an expectation-smashing 943,000 new jobs added to the economy.  

Friday is when August’s job data is published. Markets of course will be looking at it closely. It’s the big release of the month, after all. But this week’s job’s report takes on a new character given trends we’ve seen in 2021. 

For instance, April’s nonfarm payrolls stood at 785,000 new roles, registering a month-on-month increase of over 200,000. But in May, the NFP report shrank by over 500,000 to 269,000. 

June and July showed consecutive growth months, but it’s important to not get too carried away. We’ve previously seen a bumper report give way to stunted growth in the following month fairly recently.  

The Federal Reserve has explicitly tied policy decisions to labour market health, so this report will be of particular interest in the wake of last week’s Jackson Hole symposium. 

As the start of another month brings another US jobs report so too does it bring another set of OPEC+ meetings. 

Last week WTI and Brent benchmark dropped to 3-month lows, though they have since staged a bit of a rally with Brent crossing over the $70 threshold and WTI pushing over $67. 

Changing demand expectations have weighed on crude prices. Key importers have introduced travel restrictions or new lockdowns. Some Chinese oil ports, for example, have been shuttered as Delta-variant COVID-19 cases rise. 

But OPEC+ has so far stuck to its guns. It’s still committed to upping production by some 400,000 bpd per month from August onwards. It also saw no reason to push those numbers high at the urging of President Biden. For now, 400,000 bpd per month is the level. 

It’s important to reiterate everything OPEC and its allies have done this year has been to support oil prices. With COVID-19 cases mounting worldwide, the supply/demand tightrope the cartel is walking may have narrowed but OPEC+ is likely banking on vaccine rollout to help pick up the slack. 

We all know oil is a key ingredient in economic growth in our current fossil-fuel based worldwide economic system. China is the world’s largest importer of crude, so the nation’s manufacturing output falls under intense scrutiny – especially in the light of potentially lower oil imports in the past couple of months. 

We may be able to see the effects of less oil and a surge in Delta-variant cases across the past month in August’s manufacturing PMI reading. 

July’s reading of 50.4 was the lowest reading for 15 months. June’s 51.3 was a slight bump on May’s 51.0, but the trend seems to be factory output is slowing in the world’s second-largest economy.  

Shutting ports isn’t going to do factory output any favours. Neither will current high commodity prices. Labour shortages and higher input costs have factored into slowdowns in UK and US manufacturing too. This isn’t a localised Chinese phenomenon.  

A PMI reading above indicates that there is still growth, but we’re seeing China perilously close to slipping under that. Tuesday’s PMI release will reveal all. 

Major economic events 

Date  Time (GMT+1)  Asset  Event 
Mon 30-Aug  3.00pm  USD  US Pending House Sales 
       
Tue 31-Aug  2.00am  CNH  Manufacturing PMI 
  1.30pm  CAD  GDP m/m 
  2.45pm  USD  Chicago PMI 
  3.00pm  USD  CB Consumer Confidence 
       
Wed 01-Sep  ALL DAY  OIL  OPEC Meetings 
  ALL DAY  OIL  OPEC-JMMC Meetings 
  2.30am  AUD   GDP m/m 
  8.55am  EUR  German Final Manufacturing PMI 
  1.15pm  USD  ADP Nonfarm Employment Change 
  3.00pm  USD  ISM Manufacturing PMI  
  3.30pm  OIL  US Crude Oil Inventories 
       
Thu 02-Sep  3.30pm  GAS  US Natural Gas Inventories 
       
Fri 03-Sep  1.30pm  USD  US Nonfarm Payrolls 
  1.30pm  USD  Average Hourly Earnings 
  1.30pm  USD  Unemployment Rate 
  3.00pm  USD  ISM Services PMI 
  Tentative  GBP  Monetary Policy Report Hearings 

Week Ahead: All eyes on Jackson Hole

Week Ahead

The Jackson Hole Symposium is the big one this week. 

This annual gathering of top US and international finance policymakers, movers, and shakers has long been used to break major policy shifts. Markets are anticipating Fed Chair Jerome Powell will be using this year’s meeting to announce QE and stimulus policy changes. 

Powell could use the Symposium to announce a pullback from its current bond-buying programme. The Fed hinted as much in its July meetings, and there’s been plenty of rumblings that tapering is on the way, but as yet traders and investors are yet to receive an official green light.  

At present, the Fed is currently buying $120bn in fixed-income assets every month. $80bn comes from Treasury securities and the remaining $40bn is sourced from mortgage-backed securities. All of this was part of a package of ideas to help support the COVID-ravaged US economy. 

Bond traders and currency markets in particular are watching Thursday’s get together with interest. Clarity on the economy’s course, and navigational ideas to make it through a Delta-dominated landscape, will do much to allay their fears. It’s up to Powell now. 

Since the start of the year, the economy has been accelerating rapidly – even if last quarter’s GDP growth failed to meet expectations. But rapid rises can bring other challenges. In this case, they’re inflation shaped. CPI and PPI keep growing at record rates too, and while Powell has been content to let the economy run hot, he’d best put on some oven gloves, lest his fingers get burned. 

Speaking of inflation, further data on its impact is on its way with Friday’s release of Personal Consumption Expenditure index numbers, the Fed’s preferred gauge of inflation. 

PCE growth clocked in at 0.4% in July, below the expected 0.6%, but an increase of 3.5% on an annualized basis. Seeing as it has been rapidly rising across the past couple of months, no doubt Powell and co. will be keeping a very close eye on Friday’s print. 

Further economic health indicators are on their way in the shape of a Monday morning PMI blitz. We’ll get releases judging American business output then, as well as IHS Markit insights into British and European activity too.  

US flash PMI readings for manufacturing and service productivity are released on Monday. There will be a lot to unpack when these are published, particularly as July’s numbers reported solid-but-slowing growth in American business activity. 

Both services and manufacturing sectors continue to feel the twin fangs of inflation and COVID-19. Factory output caused the manufacturing index to drop from June’s 63.7 reading to 59.7 in July (a four-month low), while the services sector also pulled back from 64.6 to 59.8.  

Higher input costs, staff shortages, and rising raw material costs are limiting growth. Let’s be clear: a reading over 50 indicates growth, but it does appear there’s a slowdown occurring in American productivity. 

Much the same can be said of the UK, according to its own PMI figures. August’s index readings are published on Monday morning, but we’ve seen supply chain bottlenecks and low worker numbers hold back output.  

July’s IHS Markit UK services PMI score was 59.6, a quite significant drop from June’s 62.4. Manufacturing showed a similar drop to 59.2 from 62.2.  

“More businesses are experiencing growth constraints from supply shortages of labour and materials, while on the demand side we’ve already seen the peak phase of pent-up consumer spending,” said IHS Markit’s economics director, Tim Moore. 

Conversely, EU productivity showed a July surge. IHS Markit’s final composite Purchasing Managers’ Index reached 60.2 in July – the highest level since June 2006 – indicating a strong showing from both services and manufacturing. 

However, to sustain this, the EU will have to be careful to avoid the logistical and labour market snags that have hit the UK and US. It’s unlikely to do so, so we could be looking at a lower reading in August. 

Major economic data 

Date  Time (GMT+1)   Asset  Event 
Mon 23-Aug  8.15am  EUR  French Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  8.15am  EUR  French Flash Services PMI 
  8.30am  EUR  German Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  8.30am  EUR  German Flash Services PMI 
  9.00am  EUR  Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  9.00am  EUR  Flash Services PMI 
  9.30am  GBP  Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  9.30am  GBP  Flash Services PMI 
  2.45pm  USD  Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  2.45pm  USD  Flash Services PMI 
       
Wed 24-Aug  3.30pm  OIL  US Crude Oil Inventories 
       
Thu 25-Aug  ALL DAY  USD  Jackson Hole Symposium 
  1.30pm  USD  Preliminary GDP q/q 
  1.30pm  USD  Unemployment Claims 
       
Fri 26-Aug  ALL DAY  USD  Jackson Hole Symposium 
  1.30pm  USD  Core PCE Price Index m/m 

 

Week ahead: FOMC minutes to lift the veil on Fed’s thinking

Week Ahead

This week sees the release of the latest batch of FOMC meeting minutes, giving insight into the Fed’s inner workings. We also get some big data releases. US retail sales are in focus after an unexpected jump in June, as well as latest CPI figures for the UK economy. 

Minutes from July’s FOMC meeting are published this week.  

Things remained pretty much where they started when the Fed met for its monthly two-day meeting last month.  

It did not lift interest rates from their current historically low level, nor did the Fed announce when it planned on altering its $120bn monthly bond-buying programme.  

“Last December, the Committee indicated that it would continue to increase its holdings of Treasury securities by at least $80 billion per month and of agency mortgagebacked securities by at least $40 billion per month until substantial further progress has been made toward its maximum employment and price stability goals,” said the FOMC in a statement. “Since then, the economy has made progress toward these goals, and the Committee will continue to assess progress in coming meetings.” 

The basic undercurrent is that the economy is recovering, despite rapidly rising Covid-19 case numbers. However, prevailing changes in the economy, resulting from the pandemic, may force Chairman Powell to act quicker than expected. 

We’ve seen core inflation rise in successive CPI prints – but we’ve also seen the employment rate drop too. Last month’s nonfarm payroll print was one of the strongest for years, with 943,000 new jobs added to the US economy. The unemployment rate fell to 5.4% too. 

Job participation is one of the key metrics the Fed is using to gauge the United States’ economic health to make policy adjustments. We’ve already seen some chinwagging suggest that tapering is on the way, so this may supersede the insights we’ll gain on Wednesday’s FOMC minutes release. 

Switching to data, US retail sales figures are released this week. Markets will be looking to see if June’s surprise increase was a one-off or the start of a new trend. 

Core retail sales rose 1.1% and retail sales as a whole grew 0.6% in June, something which markets weren’t expecting. From a year-on-year perspective, sales surged 18% against June’s 2020 levels. 

According to the US Commerce Department cited Covid-19 vaccinations, low interest rates, and huge fiscal stimulus as underpinning retail sales. But, as mentioned above, this was a bit of a shock for US economists. With the US economy reopening, consumer spending was trending more towards experiences and trips, rather than consumer goods. 

In fact, at the last retail data reading, May’s stats were revised down. It was a 1.7% monthly decline in May, rather than the 1.3% originally reported. Again, this was due to the switch from consumer goods to experiences. 

Staying on the data front, July’s UK consumer price index readings come on Wednesday morning.  

June’s print showed a CPI three-year high. At 2.5% in June, up from 2.1% in the previous month, consumer price inflation is now at its highest level since 2018. That may prompt the Bank of England into changing its stance on rate hikes sooner than expected. 

That said, Governor Bailey maintained the UK central bank’s dovish stance at its August meeting, deeming CPI inflation as transitionary. No major tweaks to UK monetary policy were made at this time.  

The Bank of England has adjusted its long-term inflation outlook, however. It now believes inflation will run at 3.1% throughout the next 12 months – up from the 2.8% rate forecast in June. 

Will we see another estimate-beating CPI reading this month – and will this be enough to spur Governor Bailey and co. into action?  

Speaking of central banks, the Reserve Bank of New Zealand gives its August rate statement next week.  

Rumours are flying that the RBNZ could raise rates as early as this month. It’s already committed to removing its QE programme in a move that surprised onlookers in July.  

“Our current expectation is that the RBNZ will hike interest rates in the August Monetary Policy Statement (MPS), followed by a subsequent hike in each MPS till [the] interest rate reaches 1.75% in 2022,” said Finn Robinson, economist at Australia and New Zealand Banking Group (ANZ). 

Currently, New Zealand’s cash rate is 0.25%, the same rate it has been for the past year. 

This is likely a response to rising CPI inflation. July’s print saw New Zealand’s consumer price index rising by 1.3%, bringing total inflation to 3.3%, passing the RBNZ’s 1-3% target. 

If a rate hike is coming, New Zealand would be one of the first, if not the first, country to do so. 

It’s also the final week of this quarter’s earnings season this week. We’re not expecting too many large caps to report in, with Walmart being the largest firm still yet to report, but you can see which companies are sharing their quarterly with our earnings calendar 

Major economic events 

Date  Time (GMT+1)  Asset  Event 
Tue 17-Aug  2.30am  AUD  Monetary Policy Meeting Minutes 
  1.30pm  USD  Core Retail Sales m/m 
  1.30pm  USD  Retail Sales m/m 
       
Wed 18-Aug  3.00am  NZD  Official Cash Rate 
  3.00am  NZD  RBNZ Monetary Policy Statement 
  3.00am  NZD  RBNZ Rate Statement 
  4.00am  NZD  RBNZ Press Conference 
  7.00am  GBP  UK CPI m/m 
  1.30pm  CAD  CPI m/m 
  3.30pm  OIL  US Crude Oil Inventories 
  7.00pm  USD  FOMC Meeting Minutes 
       
Thu 19-Aug  2.30am  AUD  Employment Change 
  2.30am  AUD  Unemployment Rate 
       
Fri 20-Aug  7.00am  GBP  Retail Sales m/m 

 

Key earnings data 

Mon 16 Aug  Tue 17 Aug  Wed 18 Aug 
Roblox Corporation  Walmart   Lumentum Holdings 
 
Cisco Systems 
 
NVIDIA  

 

Week ahead: OPEC+ meets as Delta variant puts pressure on oil markets

Week Ahead

OPEC-JMMC August meetings, pushed back after July’s tough negotiations, take place this week. Traders will look to the cartel for a response to potential dents to demand recovery caused by rising Delta variant numbers worldwide.

Elsewhere, UK Q2 GDP figures are released on hopes of strong growth while US CPI inflation is in focus too with July’s stats coming this week.

It’s fair to say July was a bit of a tense month for OPEC and its allies. It will be hoping to avoid further conflicts when it meets on Thursday this week.

The Cartel has been doing its best to not go overboard with production tapering. Given the relative strength of prices, despite last week’s wobble, its efforts to curb output to protect prices have been broadly successful.

Come July’s meeting, fractures began to appear in the OPEC façade. It’s always a balancing act when its members and allies get together in order to weigh each individual member state’s interests. Oil production is an integral part of all their economies after all. In this case, the UAE was pushing hard to lighten restrictions and redress base levels – something which Saudi Arabia was resisting.

That’s all spilt milk under the bridge now. A deal was reached, after delayed and reorganise meetings and hectic negotiations on both sides. The stoppers have been loosened. New baselines were awarded to members, including chief agitator the UAE, at the eventual outcome.

An extra 400,000 bpd will be added to OPEC+ production monthly volumes from August onwards. That should bring production up to about 2m bpd by the end of 2022. OPEC also confirmed it had extended its production cut deal until April 2022.

This month’s meeting, however, takes on a different hue as rising Delta variant COVID cases continue to mount worldwide. That could majorly impact demand recovery, and thus instigate some kind of retooling to OPEC+’s plans going forward.

A slowdown in Chinese manufacturing could also affect OPEC’s thinking. China is the world’s largest crude importer, so if less oil is needed to fuel its factories then prices could drop as markets recalibrate to lowered Chinese crude imports.

Whatever happens, OPEC will no doubt be extremely keen to avoid any fortnight-long negotiations as happened in July. Either way, Thursday’s meetings will be an interesting watch.

This week also sees the publishing of the UK’s preliminary Q2 growth figures.

Strong vaccine rollout coupled with dropping COVID cases are expected to have supported growth in Q2, following the UK’s1.6% contraction in Q1. Higher consumer spending is likely to be the main growth engine, however, accounting for roughly 70% of gross domestic product between May-July.

So, what are the forecasts? The British Chamber of Commerce (BCC) believes Q2 growth will clock in at 4.1% in 2021’s second quarter.

“The UK economy is in a temporary sweet spot with the boost from the release of pent-up demand, if restrictions ease as planned, and ongoing government support expected to drive a substantial summer revival in economic activity, underpinned by the rapid vaccine rollout,” the BCC said in a statement.

Looking long term, overall GDP growth predictions float between the 7-8% mark. The Confederation of British Industry’s forecasts sit at the optimistic end of the scale at 8.1% for the year.

As it stands, however, the UK’s domestic output is still some 8.8% lower than before the pandemic. Long term growth will likely cool with the effects of inflation and lower government support as we move into 2022.

Speaking of inflation, the week’s other key data release is the US consumer price index figures for July.

If the pace of inflation continues, then it will really test the Fed’s resolve. Chairman Powell has committed to the historically low cash rate, and seems content to let the economy run hot, but is this really sustainable?

June’s CPI inflation already caused alarm for some economists. By rising 5.4% year-on-year, the index had risen at its fastest pace since August 2008.

So far, the Fed has characterised inflation as “transitionary” and is still sticking to its dovish outlook. Its data modelling calls for 3% headline inflation by the end of 2021, before falling back to 2.1% in 2022.

Given consumer spending is the US economy’s major growth engine, accounting for roughly 68% of GDP, it’s little wonder why some observers are feeling tetchy and calling for more action. Gross domestic product missed growth expectations in Q1, for instance, as high prices limited consumer spending.

July’s CPI reading may thus be doubly important for the Fed.

It’s a subdued week for earnings on Wall Street, but we still have some large caps reporting. Headliners this week include Walt Disney, Palantir, and Airbnb who all report in on Thursday.

Make sure you check out our US earnings season calendar to see which large caps are still due to share quarterly earnings this week and beyond.

Major economic data

Date Time (GMT+1) Asset Event
Tue 10-Aug 10.00am EUR ZEW Economic Sentiment
10.00am EUR German ZEW Economic Sentiment
Wed 11-Aug 1.30am AUD Westpac Consumer Sentiment
1.30pm USD CPI m/m
1.30pm USD Core CPI m/m
3.30pm OIL US Crude Oil Inventories
Thu 12-Aug ALL DAY OIL OPEC-JMMC Meetings
7.00am GBP Prelim UK GDP
1.30pm USD PPI m/m
1.30pm USD Core PPI m/m
3.30pm GAS Natural Gas

 

Key earnings data

Mon 9 Aug Tue 10 Aug Thu 12 Aug
The Trade Desk (TTD) PMO Coinbase Global (COIN) AMC Palantir Technologies (PLTR) PMO
Viatris (VTRS) PMO Airbnb (ABNB) AMC
Walt Disney (DIS) AMC

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