The US Debt Ceiling: The Only Way Is Up

With Democratic lawmakers currently working to pass a multi-trillion dollar infrastructure bill, Republican senators have rediscovered their fiscal conservatism, which appeared to temporarily desert them during the Trump era. Given their minority status in both Congressional chambers, McConnell and co are relying on a tool that served them well under the Obama administration – the debt ceiling.

Republicans are demanding that Democrats reduce the scale of their planned infrastructure bill, whose price tag could be as high as $3.5 trillion. Without cooperation on that issue, Republican senators say they will refuse to cooperate on the issue of the debt ceiling. With Senate Majority Leader Schumer already ruling out the use of the reconciliation workaround, which allows for a simple majority for a bill to pass, the only path to resolution on this issue is through a normal Senate vote. This is critical, given the 60-vote requirement for regular bills to pass in the Senate – any debt ceiling resolution will require at least 10 red-state senators to break ranks and vote aye. The achievement of 60 votes is made yet more difficult by the potential for moderate Democrats to join their Republican colleagues in blocking action on the debt ceiling, with Joe Manchin having previously expressed his discomfort with the national debt.

Secretary Yellen now says that the US is likely to hit its debt ceiling on the 18th of October, meaning the federal government will be unable to fulfil its financial obligations after this date unless the ceiling is raised or suspended. This latter point is crucial and has been somewhat muddied by Republican spin on this issue. In reality, the debt ceiling is not about new government spending at all, it is about the government’s ability to fulfil spending promises that it has already made. Such obligations include both welfare payments and the maintenance of the national debt, meaning the potential economic consequences of this saga go far beyond the passage or non-passage of Biden’s infrastructure plan.

This is not the first time that Republican lawmakers have employed such a strategy, using it in both 2011 and 2013 to extract concessions from President Obama. In both of these cases, the concessions achieved were relatively minor, and the Republicans were eventually forced to settle for a moral victory at best. On top of that, the Democrats were able to avoid the bulk of the political backlash, with only 31% of the country saying that they were to blame for the crisis in 2011. So why use such a tactic again, given that it appears on the surface to have been so unsuccessful in times past?

  • Firstly, the political landscape has shifted drastically since episodes one and two of this trilogy. President Biden is a far less formidable political adversary than his former boss, particularly with regards to charisma and control over the media narrative. McConnell will be betting that his party can do a better job of deflecting blame towards the Democrats now they don’t have to compete with Obama’s overwhelming political celebrity. This strategy already appears to be paying off, with just 16% of poll respondents blaming the Republicans for the potential default.
  • Secondly, let us not forget who the intended audience of this political stunt really is – the Republican base. Having the support of even just 31% of the country is more than enough to achieve success in US elections given their historically low turnout, especially in the midterms which are now on the horizon. Turnout will be key in 2022 and this savvy political ploy will increase Republican chances of breaking the Democratic stranglehold on Washington next year by enticing conservative voters to the polls.

With all of this being said, the actual probability of US debt default is virtually zero. This Republican routine would be much more convincing if we hadn’t seen it twice before already. Does anyone really believe that it is a coincidence that all three debt crises have come in the year prior to a midterm election? Or that lawmakers (and their donors) with combined stock portfolios in the billions would seriously allow the devastating economic damage such a default would guarantee? The final nail in the coffin for the convincingness of such a threat is the Republican voters themselves. One of the best-kept secrets in Washington is that red states receive far more in net federal spending per capita than blue states. Whilst conservative voters may love the idea of national fiscal responsibility in theory, they are far more attached to personal financial solvency in practice. If the Republicans actually allowed this debacle to get to a point where the government stopped sending welfare checks, it would be their voters who would suffer the most, and the potential political benefits of this gambit would be nowhere to be seen.

This is not to say that no economic damage will be done or that no panic will occur. In 2011 a resolution was agreed just two days before the debt ceiling was due to be reached and resulted in a US credit rating downgrade and the loss of 1.2 million jobs by 2015. Rather, the very worst fears of the financial markets will not be realised – the debt ceiling will be raised and the infrastructure bill will pass in one form or another. But it’s going to get very messy and very noisy before we get there.

Outcomes:

  1. The panic and political manoeuvring will continue, and may even stretch beyond the October 18th date stated by Yellen, if the Treasury gets creative with their accounting. This uncertainty will hit markets and the real economy but this is a sacrifice Republicans are willing to make. McConnell looks set to trade a few points in the S&P 500 for a few points at the polls in the midterms – a bit of a bargain in political terms.
  2. Moderate Democrats will use this pressure as leverage against the left in their own party who are pushing for the headline $3.5 trillion bill to be realised. This will lead to further infighting among the Democrats which the left will likely lose, meaning a smaller infrastructure package than initially intended.
  3. The chances of the Democrats maintaining or expanding their control in Washington just went down.

Adelanto semanal: reunión de la OPEP y publicación de actas del FOMC

En nuestro primer adelanto semanal del nuevo año, repasamos algunos temas especialmente jugosos. La OPEP+ inaugura la primera de sus reuniones ministeriales mensuales de este año el 4 de enero, en la que los productores debatirán una reversión gradual de los recortes de producción.

El FOMC publica las actas de su última reunión: ¿establecerán la hoja de ruta hacia la recuperación económica estadounidense? Además, también conoceremos las nóminas no agrícolas, en las cuales se podrían apreciar signos de fortaleza en el mercado laboral de EE. UU.

Reunión de la OPEP 

La primera de una nueva serie de reuniones mensuales de ministros de la OPEP y no OPEP se celebrará esta semana, tras la decisión de diciembre de posponer el proceso de disminución de los recortes de producción acordado el año pasado para apuntalar los precios.

Enero será el mes en el que los miembros de la OPEP y sus aliados aliviarán ligeramente los límites y aumentarán la producción. La OPEP+ ha dado luz verde para rellenar 500 000 barriles diarios más desde enero hasta finales de marzo. El recorte de producción total para enero será de 7,2 millones de barriles diarios con respecto a los 7,7 millones de la última parte de 2020.

Sin embargo, las expectativas en torno a la demanda no han mejorado, a pesar del advenimiento de las vacunas, por lo que la OPEP seguirá bajo presión para supervisar estrechamente la situación. Actualmente, la OPEP prevé que, en 2020, la demanda de petróleo mundial cayó en 9,77 millones de barriles diarios hasta alcanzar los 89,99 millones; en noviembre, se estimaba que esta cifra de barriles diarios superaría los 90 millones.

A día de hoy, la previsión de la demanda de petróleo para 2021 se sitúa en 95,89 millones de barriles diarios, lo que supone 410 000 barriles diarios menos que las proyecciones originales de la OPEP en su informe mensual sobre el mercado del petróleo (MOMR) de noviembre. En octubre, la OPEP estimó que la demanda de petróleo para 2021 sería de 96,8 millones de barriles diarios.

Uno de los factores más importantes para equilibrar los precios, la demanda y la producción será el nivel de cumplimiento de miembros y aliados. Ya ha habido cierta distensión entre las filas de la organización, como es el caso de Arabia Saudí, país que sopesó renunciar a su presidencia. Algunos productores del área de influencia de la OPEP cumplen a rajatabla con sus objetivos de producción, independientemente de los límites y los parones de producción establecidos.

Libia ha manifestado sus planes para aumentar su producción de petróleo y ya había declarado con anterioridad que no aceptaría ninguna cuota de producción hasta que no pueda producir de forma efectiva 1,7 millones de barriles diarios (su producción actual es de 1,108 millones de barriles diarios).

Por su parte, Irán también ha asegurado que aumentará su producción de petróleo en 2021 hasta los 2,3 millones de barriles diarios desde los 1,986 millones de barriles diarios actuales.

Actas de la FOMC 

Esta semana se prevé la publicación de las actas de la última reunión de la Fed, en las que se arrojará más luz acerca del posible desacuerdo en torno a la medida en la que el FOMC considera que necesita anclar los tipos a largo plazo y a si se precisa más soporte de las políticas. El plano de acción de la Fed comienza a trasladarse al terreno del «comercio reflacionario» y el aumento de los tipos a largo plazo.

Las expectativas de una mayor inflación podrían plantear un problema a la Fed, ya que podría verse obligada a establecer ajustes antes de lo previsto en un primer momento. Aunque el objetivo de inflación media les brinda cierto margen de maniobra, estaremos muy atentos a si los legisladores comienzan a preocuparse por la inflación y la necesidad de una mayor restricción en la política monetaria.

Nóminas no agrícolas 

El informe laboral de diciembre del viernes cerrará la semana con la posible huella en la demanda del aumento de los casos de Covid en EE. UU., aunque la contratación estacional será un factor a tener en cuenta. En noviembre, se crearon 245 000 puestos de trabajo adicionales, mientras que la tasa de desempleo descendió al 6,7 %. Este porcentaje fue bastante inferior a la tasa registrada en los últimos 6 meses, lo que apunta a una menor contratación a causa del aumento de casos en todo el país.

Sin embargo, a los mercados parece no importarles pasar por alto el menor ritmo de recuperación del mercado laboral gracias a las vacunas: el informe de diciembre es retrospectivo y reflejará el aumento de casos y las nuevas medidas de confinamiento en varios estados. Además, la reducción en el número de puestos de trabajo únicamente pone de manifiesto la necesidad de un estímulo fiscal y monetario continuo.

Segunda vuelta electoral en Georgia 

Los votantes acudirán a las urnas el 5 de enero con motivo de la segunda vuelta electoral de Georgia, en la cual se decidirá quién controlará el Senado durante la primera mitad de la presidencia de Biden.

Este hecho es crucial, ya que un Senado demócrata permitiría una realización más sencilla del programa político de Biden, el cual se centra en las energías renovables y en las inversiones en este campo. Sin embargo, las posibilidades de una débil mayoría republicana aún parecen factibles, a pesar de la victoria demócrata con escaso margen en las elecciones presidenciales, lo que representaría menos reformas fiscales y normativas.

Seminario web de perspectivas para 2021 

Martes, 5 de enero, a las 12.00 horas (GMT) 

¿Quiere saber cuáles serán los principales temas bursátiles de este nuevo año? En este seminario web, plantearemos las preguntas clave: ¿La inflación por fin alzará la voz? ¿El mercado de renta variable británico se pondrá a la altura de sus homólogos? ¿Las vacunas propiciarán un regreso reflacionario a la normalidad? Únase al responsable de análisis de mercados Neil Wilson y conozca la respuesta a las preguntas clave de nuestras perspectivas para 2021.

Regístrese

Principales datos económicos de esta semana

Date  Time (GMT)  Currency  Event 
Mon Jan 4th  9.00am  EUR  Final Manufacturing PMI 
       
  9.30am  GBP  Final Manufacturing PMI 
       
  All Day  All  OPEC-JMMC Meeting 
       
  2.30pm  CAD  Manufacturing PMI 
       
  3.00pm  USD  ISM Manufacturing PMI 
       
Tue Jan 5th  9.30am  GBP  Construction PMI 
       
Wed Jan 6th  9.00am  EUR  Final Services PMI 
       
  9.30am  GBP  Final Services PMI 
       
  1.15pm  USD  ADP Nonfarm Employment Change 
       
  3.00pm  USD  ISM Services PMI 
       
  3.30pm  USD  US Crude Oil Inventories 
       
  7.00pm  USD  FOMC Meeting Minutes 
       
Thu Jan 7th  10.00am  EUR  CPI Flash Estimate 
       
  10.00am  EUR  Core CPI Flash Estimate 
       
  1.30pm  USD  Unemployment Changes 
       
  3.30pm  USD  US Natural Gas Inventories 
       
Fri Jan 8th  1.30am  CNH  CPI y/y 
       
  1.30am  CNH  PPI y/y 
       
  1.30pm  CAD  Employment Change 
       
  1.30pm  CAD  Unemployment Rate 
       
  1.30pm  USD  Average Hourly Earnings m/m 
       
  1.30pm  USD  Nonfarm Employment Change 
       
  1.30pm  USD  Unemployment Rate 
       
  3.00pm  CAD  Ivey PMI 

 

Principales informes de resultados de esta semana

Date  Company  Event 
Mon Jan 4th  State Street Corp.  Q4 2021 Earnings 
     
Wed Jan 6th  RPM International  Q2 2021 Earnings 
     
Thu Jan 7th  Micron Technology  Q1 2021 Earnings 
     
  Constellation Brands  Q3 2021 Earnings 
     
  Walgreens Boots Alliance  Q1 2021 Earnings 
     
  ConAgra Foods  Q2 2021 Earnings 
     
  Lamb Weston Holdings  Q2 2021 Earnings 
     
Fri Jan 8th  Tata Consultancy Services  Q3 2021 Earnings 

Week Ahead: OPEC meets & FOMC releases minutes

In our first week ahead of the year, we’re checking out some particularly meaty topics. OPEC+ begins the first of this year’s new monthly ministerial meetings on Jan 4th as producers discuss gradually unwinding production cuts.  

The FOMC releases its latest meeting minutes – will they be a roadmap for US economic recovery? Plus, US nonfarm payrolls are released, which could show signs of strength in the United States’ job market. 

OPEC meeting 

The first of a new series of monthly meetings of OPEC and non-OPEC ministers kicks of this week, following on from December’s decision to delay the process of tapering production cuts agreed last year to prop up prices. 

This is the month where OPEC members plus allies will ease the stoppers slightly and increase production. OPEC+ has given the greenlight to pump an extra 500,000bpd from January until at least March. The total production cut for January will be 7.2m bpd compared to the 7.7m bpd cut in the latter part of 2020. 

However, demand expectations have failed to improve despite vaccines so pressure will remain on OPEC to monitor the situation closely. OPEC now expects global oil demand to have fallen to 9.77 million barrels per day in 2020 to reach 89.99m bpd, compared to over 90m bpd in its November estimations.  

2021 oil demand is now forecast at 95.89m bpd. That’s down 410,000 from the original OPEC projections published in the November MOMR. In October, OPEC had estimated 2021 oil demand to be 96.8m bpd. 

One key aspect of balancing price vs demand vs production will be member and ally compliance. There has already been a bit of dissention within the ranks, with likes of Saudi Arabia considering giving up its chairman position, for instance. Some producers within OPEC’s sphere of influence are steadfastly sticking to their own production targets, regardless of limits and stops. 

Libya has voiced its plans to increase its oil production and has previously stated that it will not accept any production quota until such a point where it can reliably produce 1.7 million bpd—compared to its current 1.108 million bpd. 

Iran, too, has promised to increase its oil production to 2.3 million bpd in 2021, up from 1.986 million bpd now. 

FOMC Meeting Minutes 

Minutes from the latest Fed meeting are on tap – giving a clearer indication of possible dissension over the extent to which the FOMC feels it needs to anchor long-term rates and whether further policy support is required. The question for the Fed is starting to pivot towards the reflation trade and rising long-term rates. 

Rising inflation expectations may be a problem for the Fed as it could force it into tightening sooner than previously expected. Whilst average inflation targeting gives it some leeway, we’ll be paying close to attention to whether individual policymakers are starting to fret over inflation and the need for more restraint in monetary policy.  

Nonfarm Payrolls 

The December jobs report caps off the week on Friday with surging Covid cases in the US likely to weigh on demand, albeit seasonal hiring will be a factor to considerIn November, a further 245,000 jobs were added to the US economy, whilst the unemployment rate edged down to 6.7%. This was well below the run rate of the last 6 months and indicated a slowing in hiring as case counts rose across the country. 

However, markets seem to be largely happy to overlook a softer pace of recovery in the jobs market though thanks to vaccines – December‘s report is backwards-looking and will reflect surging case numbers and new lockdown restrictions across multiple states. Moreover, soft jobs numbers only underline the need for sustained monetary and fiscal stimulus – we’re in a bad news is good news phase. 

Georgia Runoffs 

Voters will go to the polls for the Georgia Runoffs on January 5th in an election that will decide control of the Senate for the first two years of Joe Biden’s presidency. 

This will be exceptionally important, as a Blue Senate should mean easier passage of Biden’s agenda, which is pointed towards green energy and investment. However, the chances of a slim Republican majority seem pretty gooddespite November’s slim Democrat victory in the presidential elections, which would mean less regulatory and tax overhang. 

Outlook 2021 webinar 

Tuesday 5th January, 12.00 GMT 

Want to know what the key market topics will be in the new year? We’re asking the big questions with this webinar: Will inflation be the dog that finally barks? Will the UK stock market finally catch up? Will vaccines spur a reflationary return to normal environment? Join chief market analyst Neil Wilson to get the answers to the big questions in our 2021 Outlook. 

Sign up 

Major economic data 

Date  Time (GMT)  Currency  Event 
Mon Jan 4th  9.00am  EUR  Final Manufacturing PMI 
       
  9.30am  GBP  Final Manufacturing PMI 
       
  All Day  All  OPEC-JMMC Meeting 
       
  2.30pm  CAD  Manufacturing PMI 
       
  3.00pm  USD  ISM Manufacturing PMI 
       
Tue Jan 5th  9.30am  GBP  Construction PMI 
       
Wed Jan 6th  9.00am  EUR  Final Services PMI 
       
  9.30am  GBP  Final Services PMI 
       
  1.15pm  USD  ADP Nonfarm Employment Change 
       
  3.00pm  USD  ISM Services PMI 
       
  3.30pm  USD  US Crude Oil Inventories 
       
  7.00pm  USD  FOMC Meeting Minutes 
       
Thu Jan 7th  10.00am  EUR  CPI Flash Estimate 
       
  10.00am  EUR  Core CPI Flash Estimate 
       
  1.30pm  USD  Unemployment Changes 
       
  3.30pm  USD  US Natural Gas Inventories 
       
Fri Jan 8th  1.30am  CNH  CPI y/y 
       
  1.30am  CNH  PPI y/y 
       
  1.30pm  CAD  Employment Change 
       
  1.30pm  CAD  Unemployment Rate 
       
  1.30pm  USD  Average Hourly Earnings m/m 
       
  1.30pm  USD  Nonfarm Employment Change 
       
  1.30pm  USD  Unemployment Rate 
       
  3.00pm  CAD  Ivey PMI 

 

Key earnings data 

Date  Company  Event 
Mon Jan 4th  State Street Corp.  Q4 2021 Earnings 
     
Wed Jan 6th  RPM International  Q2 2021 Earnings 
     
Thu Jan 7th  Micron Technology  Q1 2021 Earnings 
     
  Constellation Brands  Q3 2021 Earnings 
     
  Walgreens Boots Alliance  Q1 2021 Earnings 
     
  ConAgra Foods  Q2 2021 Earnings 
     
  Lamb Weston Holdings  Q2 2021 Earnings 
     
Fri Jan 8th  Tata Consultancy Services  Q3 2021 Earnings 

CySEC (UE)

  • Los fondos de los clientes se conservan en cuentas bancarias separadas
  • Programa de Indemnización (FSCS) de hasta 20.000 EUR
  • Cobertura del seguro de 1.000.000€**
  • Protección de saldo negativo

Productos

  • Las operaciones con pares de divisas y CFD conllevan un gran riesgo de sufrir pérdidas
  • Gestión de acciones
  • Quantranks

Markets.com está administrada por Safecap Investments Limited. Autorizada por la CySEC con número de licencia 092/08 y por la FSCA con número de licencia 43906.

FSC (RESTO DEL MUNDO)

  • Los fondos de los clientes se conservan en cuentas bancarias separadas
  • Verificación electrónica
  • Protección de saldo negativo
  • Cobertura del seguro de 1.000.000$**

Productos

  • Las operaciones con pares de divisas y CFD conllevan un gran riesgo de sufrir pérdidas
  • Creador de estrategias

Markets.com, administrada por Finalto (BVI) Limited (“Finalto BVI”) Regulated by the BVI Financial Services Commission (‘FSC’) under licence no. SIBA/L/14/1067.

FCA (Reino Unido)

  • Los fondos de los clientes se conservan en cuentas bancarias separadas
  • Programa de Indemnización para los Inversores (ICF) de hasta 85.000 GBP
    * en función e los criterios y la idoneidad
  • Cobertura del seguro de 1.000.000£**
  • Protección de saldo negativo

Productos

  • Las operaciones con pares de divisas y CFD conllevan un gran riesgo de sufrir pérdidas
  • Cotizaciones de spread
  • Creador de estrategias

Markets.com, administrada por Finalto Trading Limited Regulada por la Autoridad de Conducta Financiera («FCA») con número de licencia 607305.

ASIC (Australia)

  • Los fondos de los clientes se conservan en cuentas bancarias separadas
  • Verificación electrónica
  • Protección de saldo negativo
  • Cobertura del seguro de 1.000.000$**

Productos

  • CFD

Markets.com, administrada por Finalto (Australia) Pty Limited. Tiene el número de Licencia de Servicios Financieros Australianos 424008 y está autorizada para prestar servicios financieros por la comisión del Mercado de Valores de Australia («ASIC”).

Al seleccionar uno de estos reguladores, se mostrará la información correspondiente en todo el sitio web. Si desea ver información para otro regulador, selecciónelo. Para obtener más información, haga clic aquí.

**Sujeto a los Términos y condiciones correspondientes. Consulte la política completa para obtener más información.

Marketsi
An individual approach to investing.

Whether you’re investing for the long-term, medium-term or even short-term, Marketsi puts you in control. You can take a traditional approach or be creative with our innovative Investment Strategy Builder tool, our industry-leading platform and personalised, VIP service will help you make the most of the global markets without the need for intermediaries.

Share Dealing in the Markets Group is only offered by Safecap Investments Limited regulated by CySEC under license number 092/08. We are now re-directing you to Safecap’s website.

Redirect

¿Se ha perdido?

Hemos detectado que está en el sitio de . Puesto que se conecta desde una ubicación en , debería considerar volver a entrar en , sitio sujeto a las medidas de intervención de productos de la . Si bien puede navegar en este sitio por iniciativa propia y exclusiva, al consultar el sitio de su país se mostrará la información reglamentaria correspondiente y las protecciones pertinentes de la empresa que elija. ¿Quiere ser redirigido a ?