Will the Bank of England actually raise rates in November?

• GBPUSD hits highest in a month ahead of tomorrow’s CPI inflation print
• Hike in November fully priced by markets…
• But will the MPC hawks have enough votes?

Recent commentary from senior Bank of England officials indicates the Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) will raise interest rates when it next meets in November, barely over two weeks from now. Market positioning has also shifted significantly in recent weeks from a single hike next year to one this year and at least two next, with the base rate expected to hit 1% by August.

BoE members have had numerous occasions to push back against market expectations and have led traders towards a November hike as being the most likely outcome. Over the weekend governor Andrew Bailey stressed that the Bank of England “will have to act” to counter inflation. That’s one for team sticky – which if you are a regular reader, you will know I’ve been saying all along. “That’s why we, at the Bank of England, have signalled, and this is another such signal, that we will have to act,” Bailey said. “But, of course, that action comes in our monetary policy meetings.” Ah, but which policy meeting did he mean? Did he mean November – the market certainly thinks so, and there has been no push back on that. Failure to raise rates next month risks Bailey becoming the Old Lady’s second unreliable boyfriend and the inevitable disapprobation for her taste in gentlemen.

Inflation problems

Inflation expectations in the UK increased to 4.1% in September from 3.1% in August of 2021. Actual inflation is also rising quickly. The latest Consumer Prices Index (CPI) rose by 3.2% in the 12 months to August 2021, up from 2% in July. The increase of 1.2 percentage points is the largest ever recorded increase in the CPI series, which began in January 1997. Soaring energy costs are a big factor, but the whole basket is seeing upwards pressure.

The reading of tomorrow’s CPI print is important. Another hot reading underlines the sense of urgency at the BoE. Cooler raises concerns that officials have got their communication muddled. It is once again expected to hit 3.2%.

Team sticky is winning for now but team transient have some cards up their sleeves. For instance, headline inflation would have been 0.3 percentage points lower in August 2021 without the Eat Out to Help Out discounts in August 2020. Demand destruction from higher prices may also start to feed into lower run rates for inflation.

Yield curve inversion

Markets are pricing in a fairly aggressive tightening cycle by the BoE. 2yr gilt yields have hit a two-and-a-half year high. This could be premature – the MPC may not be as hawkish as recent signals indicate, but if it’s correct then the market is also anticipating that the Bank would quickly need to reverse its actions. Forwards and implied interest rate expectations point to inversion – higher rates at the front end, lower further out. This only implies the market believes the Bank would be making a ‘policy mistake’ by hiking prematurely. Others would point out that taming inflation is its core mandate.

Certainly, the BoE like all central bank is dealing with something rather new: a supply shock. Central banks’ policy toolkits are based around levers to drive demand when it is low. They cannot fix supply crunches and imbalances in the economy very easily by stimulating demand. Nevertheless, the Bank is clearly mindful that allowing inflation to run rampant would a) destroy its credibility and b) allow longer-term inflation expectations to become de-anchored. If supply-side worries are longer lasting than first thought, and demand stays robust, it seems prudent for the MPC to use what tools it has to lean on inflation. What’s clear is that the intense debate around the recent comments and change in market expectations shows the Bank is not doing a particularly good job of communicating its position. We may be left in a position where the MPC hikes a couple of times and then has to dial it back, which risks its credibility – albeit whether more or less than it would by allowing inflation expectations off the leash is an open question.

The last meeting

• MPC voted 7-2 to maintain QE, unanimous on rates
• Ramsden joins Saunders in voting to scale back the QE programme to £840bn, ending it immediately
• CPI inflation is expected to rise further in the near term, to slightly above 4% in 2021 Q4 – and the BoE signalled greater risk it would be above target for most of 2022
• Overall, Bank staff had revised down their expectations for 2021 Q3 GDP growth from 2.9% at the time of the August Report to 2.1%, in part reflecting the emergence of some supply constraints on output
• Shift in forward guidance: MPC noted ‘some developments … [since the August Monetary Policy Report] … appear to have strengthened’ the case for tightening monetary policy.
• Rate hikes could come early, even before end of QE: “All members in this group agreed that any future initial tightening of monetary policy should be implemented by an increase in Bank Rate, even if that tightening became appropriate before the end of the existing UK government bond asset purchase programme.”

Doves vs Hawks

But will it go for the hike? The MPC is relatively evenly split in terms of hawks and doves, so it is not abundantly clear if the recent messaging from some members – albeit including the governor – matches with the votes.

Bailey has sounded hawkish, and we know Ramsden and Saunders are itching to act. Huw Pill, the new chief economist replacing Andy Haldane has also sounded hawkish, though less so than his predecessor.

Commenting after UK inflation expectations hit 4% for the first time since 2008, he said: “The rise in wholesale gas prices threatens to raise retail energy costs next year, sustaining CPI inflation rates above 4 per cent into 2022 second quarter.” We place him in the ‘leaning hawkish’ camp.

On the dovish side, Silvana Tenreyro is highly unlikely to vote for a hike next month, calling rate rises to counter inflation ‘self-defeating’.

Deputy Governor Broadbent said in July that he saw reasons for the inflation tide to ebb. The spike in energy prices since then could lead him to change his mind but for now, we place in the ‘leaning dovish’ camp,

Rate-setter Haskel said in May he’s not worried by inflation, and in July said there was no need to reduce stimulus in the foreseeable future. He goes in the Dovish camp with Catherine Mann, who said last week that she can hold off from raising rates since markets are doing some of the tightening already. “There’s a lot of endogenous tightening of financial conditions already in train in the UK. That means that I can wait on active tightening through a Bank Rate rise,” she said.

That leaves Jon Cunliffe somewhat the swing voter. In July he stressed that inflation was a bump in the road to recovery. We look to see whether the recent spike in inflation and inflation expectations has nudged the likes of Cunliffe, Pill and even Broadbent to move to the Hawkish camp. It seems unlikely that governor Bailey would have pointed the market towards quicker hikes if he did already have a feeling for the MPC’s views on the matter.

Dovish  Leaning dovish  Centre  Leaning hawkish  Hawkish 
Tenreyro

Mann

Haskel

Broadbent Cunliffe Pill Saunders

Ramsden

Bailey

Charts

GBPUSD: The hawkishness from policymakers and market repricing for hikes has supported £, though we do note some noticeable dollar weakness in Tuesday’s session that is flattering the view that it’s all BoE driven. Cable breaks new highs ahead of CPI, above 1.3820 to test the 50% retracement off the May peak. Bullish MACD crossover still in play, but starting to look a tad extended.

GBPUSD Chart 19.10.2021

EURGBP Gains capped with a stronger EUR today, but has made a fresh 18-month high. BoE racing to hike against a much more dovish ECB ought to be positive, but yield curve inversion highlights the dangers of viewing FX trades purely from a CB tightening/loosening point of view.

EURUSD 19.10.2021

Yields and central banks on the move

Central banks on the move: Norway’s central bank became the first in the G10 to raise rates after the pandemic, Turkey’s central bank – an outlier – lowered rates (to 18%), whilst the Bank of England and Federal Reserve sat on their hands but indicated they too are about to start moving. Yields are on the move too as bonds sell off on tightening expectations. Something has clearly changed and positioning on rates is shifting. US 10yr yields jumped to 1.44%, posting their biggest one-day gain since March, whilst 30yr bond yields jumped the most in a single day since March 2020. European bond yields are also marching higher.

Although the Fed and BoE remain fairly cautious and the dogma of transitory inflation persists, they’re starting to move beyond pandemic-era emergency mode. Investors see this and are moving too – rates steepening again as they did earlier this year. As we noted yesterday morning, whilst the initial reaction to the Fed’s announcement on Wednesday saw the yield curve flatten, the steepening as the long end picks up is the natural response to the Fed turning more hawkish – it was not just earlier for lift-off but also more hikes in 2023/24. Investors are also betting on higher inflation for longer. US inflation expectations ticked higher too, hitting a month high, helping gold to fend off the move in nominal rates to trade around $1,750, having put in a near-term low at $1,737. The dollar also made a strong move lower yesterday, adding further support.

Stocks rallied on Wall Street, mega cap growth just underperforming a bit as yields rose, helping financials do well. The S&P 500 recovered the 50-day SMA at 4,437 and closed above at 4,448.98. Small caps outperformed with the Russell 2000 picking up almost 2% as reflation trade thinking resurfaced. Energy was the top performer on the S&P 500 again as crude oil (Nov) broke through $73, whilst Brent is testing a 3-year high. Natural gas is back above $5 this morning.

Stocks trade weaker in the early part of the session in Europe as investors digest the selloff in global bonds and look ahead to the uncertainty of the German election on Sunday, which may be a factor for the DAX today. Helen Thomas of BlondeMoney has an excellent preview on the topic for us. The FTSE 100 sits around 7,050, slap in the middle of the range it’s treaded since April. AstraZeneca shares rose 3% as its Lynparza cancer drug performed well in its PROpel Phase III trials. Shares in Hong Kong fell over 1% with Evergrande down 13% as it apparently missed a deadline for an interest payment of $83.5m on an offshore bond.

The US dollar is drifting higher this morning after yesterday’s selloff with near-term momentum positive having briefly hit its highest since Aug 20th. Tweeted yesterday about topping pattern for USD and yesterday’s (just about) outside day candle could be the reversal signal.

Dollar Index 24.09.2021

GBPUSD is holding most of yesterday’s gains but has just pared back a touch to trade at 1.3710 after hitting 1.3750.

GBPUSD Chart 24.09.2021

Sterling HOD, FTSE weaker as markets digest slightly hawkish BoE

After a bit of time to digest the Bank of England decision, it looks to have provided that hawkish pivot we’d anticipated. But I would not say it’s enough to really tell the market that it will fulfil its mandate to keep inflation in check and ensure longer-term inflation expectations remain in check. A missed opportunity, I would say, to get a better grip on inflation expectations.

Key points

• MPC votes 7-2 to maintain QE, unanimous on rates
• Ramsden joins Saunders in voting to scale back the QE programme to £840bn, ending it immediately
• CPI inflation is expected to rise further in the near term, to slightly above 4% in 2021 Q4 – and the BoE signalled greater risk it would be above target for most of 2022
• Overall, Bank staff had revised down their expectations for 2021 Q3 GDP growth from 2.9% at the time of the August Report to 2.1%, in part reflecting the emergence of some supply constraints on output
• Shift in forward guidance: MPC noted ‘some developments … [since the August Monetary Policy Report] … appear to have strengthened’ the case for tightening monetary policy.
• Rate hikes could come early, even before end of QE: “All members in this group agreed that any future initial tightening of monetary policy should be implemented by an increase in Bank Rate, even if that tightening became appropriate before the end of the existing UK government bond asset purchase programme.”

Market reaction thus far

• GBPUSD has rallied to highest since Monday off a month low and is looking to hold above 1.37, having risen one big figure today. Needs 1.3740 for bulls to regain control, big test here with trend support recently tested at the neckline. Question is this mildly hawkish pivot is enough to put the floor under GBP. I would still argue for softer dollar into year end allow GBP (and EUR) some scope to strengthen, particularly if the BoE is progressing towards raising rates sooner than previously thought.
• That sterling strength sent the FTSE 100 lower after a solid morning session, leaving the blue chips flat on the session, around 45pts off the highs of the day. Looking now for a lift from Wall St with US futures indicated higher: S&P 500 around 4420, Dow Jones at 34,460.
• 2yr gilt yields jumped to +0.3435% from around 0.28% earlier in the day as markets moved expectations for the first 15bps rate hike forward to Feb 2022.

GBPUSD chart 23.09.2021

Summary view

The BoE trying to tell what we already know without telling us what we already know; ie, that inflation is way stickier than they thought it would be. The BoE said “there are some signs that cost pressures may prove more persistent. Some financial market indicators of inflation expectations have risen somewhat”. Somewhat what? It’s all a bit wishy washy. The problem is the dogma of transient inflation is hard to shake without admitting that they were plain wrong on a very basic assessment of the economic outlook. “The committee’s central expectation continues to be that current elevated global cost pressures will prove transitory,” the statement from the BoE said.

Earlier, PMIs show across Europe and Britain growth momentum is waning, inflation is sticking. The UK composite PMI revealed further loss of growth momentum as output slowed to the weakest in 7 months, whilst the rate of input cost inflation accelerated and charges raised to the greatest extent on record.

Taken together with the PMIs this morning and the Fed last night we are presented with a very simple picture: growth is slowing, supply constraints are deepening, inflation is proving way more persistent than central banks anticipated. This could have important consequences for monetary policy going forward, but for now the CBs are still waiting it out and getting further behind the curve. A bitter pill today has been avoided, but the medicine required will be harder to swallow when it finally comes. Rates are going to need to rise to tame inflation.

Bank of England responds to hot inflation print

The Bank of England will need to respond to biggest jump in inflation on record when it convenes this week. Inflation accelerated to 3.2% in August from 2% in July, well above the central bank’s 2% target. Could this force the BoE to tighten monetary policy sooner than had been expected? A hawkish-sounding Bank of England would be a boost for sterling. In order to be hawkish enough to nudge sterling higher and show it’s prepared to kill inflation as required, the Bank probably ought to end QE now – as the now ex-MPC hawk Andy Haldane argued for last time around. There is a clear risk inflation will overshoot the 4% forecast, let alone the 2% goal. Unanchored inflation expectations are the worst possible outcome for a central bank they’ve been too slow to recognise the pandemic has completely changed the disinflationary world of 2008-2020. Hikes will be required too in the not too distant future and the bank should appreciate that a bitter pill now would be better than even harsher medicine later on. A jobs market with 1m vacancies does not suggest the UK economy is in trouble at the moment. Wage growth remains strong – albeit the picture is very complex due to furlough, the pandemic and base effects + inflation on real wages.

Does the bank go for a more hawkish signal? That is harder to say: it’s already well into a taper and markets anticipate the BoE will be raising rates 2-3 times over the next couple of years – does it need to do more than that? The question is whether the inflation ready has got the right kind of attention that it deserves or whether the BoE is ignoring the red flags. My own view, for what it’s worth, is that the Bank, just like the Fed, has allowed inflation overshoots to allow for the recovery, but it’s been too slow and too generous. Much like the response to the pandemic itself, the medicine (QE, ZIRP) being administered may be doing more harm (inflation) than good (growth, jobs).

Adelanto semanal: ¿próximo anuncio de reducción en la compra de activos de la Fed?

Los analistas centrarán su atención en la Reserva Federal y en si aprovechará la reunión de septiembre del FOMC, que se celebra esta semana, para anunciar su tan esperada reducción de compras de activos. Por su parte, el Banco de Inglaterra, a raíz de la elevada inflación atestiguada en los datos de la semana pasada, sopesará si virar hacia una postura más conservadora.

¿Próximo anuncio de reducción de compras de activos por parte de la Fed?

Aunque los mercados no esperan que la Reserva Federal se apresure a reducir la compra de activos, el consenso general del mercado es que empezará a ralentizar el ritmo de su programa de compra de activos a partir de noviembre. Esto significa que la reunión de esta semana podría ser un momento oportuno para que la Fed avise con tiempo al mercado.

La inflación que evidenció el IPC la semana pasada nubló ligeramente las perspectivas: los datos fueron más favorables de lo previsto, lo que supuso cierto respiro a la Fed. Lo más importante es que los malos datos laborales de agosto apuntan a que la Fed podría no apostarlo todo a una reducción a partir de noviembre, al menos de momento. Esto podría suponer que aún considera que es pertinente poner en marcha la reducción este año, sin ofrecer fechas concretas.

Los inversores estarán más interesados en saber cómo van a valorar los legisladores el ritmo de recuperación del mercado laboral y si consideran que las presiones inflacionistas están resultando ser menos transitorias de lo que pensaban. Estaremos muy pendientes de las últimas rondas de proyecciones económicas para tener una idea de si la Fed cambiará de parecer con respecto al ritmo de la inflación y del crecimiento.

El Banco de Inglaterra responde a la elevada inflación

El Banco de Inglaterra (BoE) deberá responder en su reunión de esta semana al mayor incremento de la inflación desde que se tienen registros. La inflación aumentó al 3,2 % en agosto desde el 2 % de julio, situándose muy por encima del objetivo del 2 % del banco central. ¿Podría este dato forzar al BoE a restringir su política monetaria antes de lo previsto? Un BoE con ecos conservadores sería un catalizador para la libra.

Datos económicos fundamentales

Además de lo anterior, los mercados esperan una tanda de datos económicos esta semana, incluida la ronda de PMI preliminares de la zona del euro, Reino Unido y EE. UU. que tendrá lugar el jueves. El Banco de Japón se reúne esta semana: el gobernador Kuroda recientemente señaló que el banco central relajará aún más su política monetaria y que incluso reduciría los tipos de interés si fuera necesario.

Resultados de Nike y FedEx

La agenda de resultados está prácticamente despejada, pero aún falta por conocer los datos de Nike y FedEx, entre otras empresas. En junio, Nike publicó unos datos muy sólidos del 4T, lo que llevó a la cotización de sus acciones a alcanzar un nuevo máximo histórico. Las ventas del 4T aumentaron un 96 % frente al trimestre del año anterior, y un 21 % con respecto a 2019. Los márgenes también están mejorando a buen ritmo conforme la estrategia de la empresa de ofrecer sus productos directamente a los clientes da sus frutos. «El ejercicio de 2021 fue un año de inflexión para NIKE, puesto que llevamos al mercado nuestra estrategia de aceleración directa hacia nuestros clientes», afirmó John Donahoe, su CEO. Sin embargo, las acciones han bajado últimamente entre temores en torno a los estragos de la cadena de suministro, con millones de unidades de producción perdidas en Vietnam a causa de la Covid.

«A lo largo de su historia, las acciones de Nike han estado muy correlacionadas con el crecimiento de las ventas, por lo que ante la mayor evidencia de un probable estancamiento de las ventas, creemos que las acciones de Nike se mantendrán a flote, en el mejor de los casos, hasta que se aclare la situación en torno a los problemas de manufactura y, en el peor de los casos, se rebajarán las perspectivas de ventas con una consiguiente contracción múltiple», sentenciaron los analistas de BTIG en una nota en la que rebajaban la acción a neutro.

También estaremos pendientes de la publicación de los resultados de Adobe, General Mills y Costco.

Principales datos económicos

Mon Sep 20  12:01am  GBP  Rightmove HPI m/m 
  All Day  JPY  Japan Bank Holiday 
  All Day  CNH  China Bank Holiday 
  7:00am  EUR  German PPI m/m 
  Tentative  EUR  German Buba Monthly Report 
  3:00pm  USD  NAHB Housing Market Index 
  All Day  CAD  Canada Federal Election 
  10:00pm  NZD  Westpac Consumer Sentiment 
Tue Sep 21  All Day  CNH  China Bank Holiday 
  2:30am  AUD  Monetary Policy Meeting Minutes 
  7:00am  CHF  Trade Balance 
    GBP  Public Sector Net Borrowing 
  11:00am  GBP  CBI Industrial Order Expectations 
  1:30pm  CAD  NHPI m/m 
    USD  Building Permits 
    USD  Current Account 
    USD  Housing Starts 
  2:00pm  CNH  CB Leading Index m/m 
  3:30pm  AUD  CB Leading Index m/m 
  Tentative  NZD  GDT Price Index 
Wed Sep 22  Tentative  JPY  Monetary Policy Statement 
  Tentative  JPY  BOJ Policy Rate 
  Tentative  JPY  BOJ Press Conference 
  2:00pm  CHF  SNB Quarterly Bulletin 
  3:00pm  EUR  Consumer Confidence 
    USD  Existing Home Sales 
  3:30pm  Oil  Crude Oil Inventories 
  7:00pm  USD  FOMC Economic Projections 
    USD  FOMC Monetary Policy Statement 
  7:30pm  USD  FOMC Press Conference 
Thu Sep 23  12:00am  AUD  Flash Manufacturing PMI 
    AUD  Flash Services PMI 
  All Day  JPY  Japan Bank Holiday 
  Tentative  EUR  German Import Prices m/m 
  8:15am  EUR  French Flash Manufacturing PMI 
    EUR  French Flash Services PMI 
  8:30am  CHF  SNB Monetary Policy Assessment 
    CHF  SNB Policy Rate 
    EUR  German Flash Manufacturing PMI 
    EUR  German Flash Services PMI 
  9:00am  EUR  Flash Manufacturing PMI 
    EUR  Flash Services PMI 
    EUR  ECB Economic Bulletin 
  9:30am  GBP  UK Flash Manufacturing PMI 
    GBP  UK Flash Services PMI 
  12:00pm  GBP  Bank of England monetary policy decision 
  1:30pm  CAD  Core Retail Sales m/m 
    CAD  Retail Sales m/m 
    USD  US unemployment Claims 
  2:45pm  USD  US Flash Manufacturing PMI 
    USD  US Flash Services PMI 
  3:00pm  USD  CB Leading Index m/m 
  3:30pm  Nat Gas  Natural Gas Storage 
  10:45pm  NZD  Trade Balance 
Fri Sep 24  12:01am  GBP  GfK Consumer Confidence 
  12:30am  JPY  National Core CPI y/y 
  1:30am  JPY  Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  7:00am  EUR  German GfK Consumer Climate 
  9:00am  EUR  German ifo Business Climate 
  3:00pm  USD  New Home Sales 

 

 

Stocks start the session weaker

Stocks in Europe are a tad weaker at the open after Monday’s rally, sticking to the recent well-worn ranges. US trading returns today with futures indicating a flattish open. There was a decent session in Asia overnight spurred on by strong data from China with the Nikkei 225 touching 30,000 for the first time since April, and the Topix hitting a 31-year high as the technical breakout from last week continues. Stocks in Shanghai and Shenzen were also up +1%. Despite all the worries about supply chains and Delta, Chinese exports surged in August by 25.6% year-on-year, up from the 19.3.% increase in July and beating the forecast of 17.1%. Sticking with China for a moment, shares in Evergrande, the indebted real estate giant, sank further to the weakest since 2015 as the fallout from its default risk continues to ripple through the property sector, where bond yields are rising fast. 

 

With stock futures doing little in the US and coming off the back of a three-day weekend, the focus will be on the cash equity open later on Wall Street in the wake of Friday’s disappointing jobs report and the lapsing of those last $300 stimulus cheques.  Still the relentless low-vol grind up is holding and Barclays today has lifted its S&P 500 price target to 4600 from 4400. Question is whether Sep/Oct produces a spike in volatility. A 3% drawdown – mild by anyone’s standards – takes you back to the 50-day SMA support that has held up so well this year, while a 10% correction tests the 200-day SMA. Technicals at the moment indicate sideways action and a loss of upwards momentum – merely a question of timing as to when we get a rollover. 

 

Interesting comments from the Bank of England’s Michael Saunders this morning, who said it might be right to think of rates going up in the next year or so. He indicated that the economy was already about the same size as it was before the pandemic, that inflation has been stronger than expected, and that the country does not need as much stimulus as previously. However, it should be noted that Saunders is about the most hawkish on the nine-member MPC so does not speak for the central consensus. I don’t think it tells us much we don’t already know but it underscores the conundrum facing central banks today as to when to ease off the gas. Saunders makes an important point in noting that continuing asset purchases when inflation is 4% might cause medium-term inflation expectations to drift higher, which could cause a more severe monetary policy response down the road. If central banks don’t get a grip on it now, they could be faced with bigger problems later – but they are all deeply paranoid about choking off recovery too soon. GBPUSD tried to rally on the comments but quickly reversed to hit its weakest since Sep 2nd. 

 

E-commerce winner DS Smith shares rose after the company said trading remains strong with solid box volume growth over 2019 levels, particularly in the US and southern Europe. But input costs continue to rise with management mentioning notable increases in the cost of energy and transportation. ‘Given the strong demand for our packaging we have seen good progress towards recovering these increases,’ the company said. Shares rallied over 2% in early trade.

 

The Reserve Bank of Australia stuck to its taper but will extend the purchase of bond purchases at $4bn a week from Nov 2021 to Feb 2022.  The RBA said the decision ‘reflects the delay in the economic recovery and the increased uncertainty associated with the Delta outbreak’. Looks like the RBA is trying to neutralise the taper they announced recently without actually rowing it back.  

 

Oil prices just tracking sideways after running into the near-term trend resistance last week. Bullish MACD crossover is still in play but momentum clearly drifting. Saudi price cut has tamed bulls but growth in Chinese exports is a +ve.

Spot Oil Chart 07.09.2021

Bank of England maintains dovish stance, raises inflation forecasts

The Bank of England today confirmed it would continue with its economy-boosting measures but said higher inflation is on the way.

Bank of England statement

Staying the course

Today, the Bank of England Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) voted to keep the historic low-interest rate in place. There will be no move from the current 0.1% base rate. Additionally, members voted 7-1 to keep the £895bn quantitative easing programme in place.

Policymakers struck a cautiously optimistic tone at today’s Bank of England press conference. However, Governor Bailey and council members did signal policy will be subject to modest tightening from here on out.

The BoE also raised its inflation forecasts. Economists were expecting this, given CPI has passed targets for two consecutive months.

In its monetary policy report, the Bank of England said: “Overall, Bank staff now expect inflation to rise materially further in the near term, temporarily reaching 4% in 2021 Q4 and 2022 Q1, 1½ percentage points higher than in the May projection.”

The report also outlined that the recent acceleration in CPI inflation is mainly due to volatility in energy and the prices of other goods. In the medium term, the Bank said it expects inflation to peter out and fall back to around its current 2% target.

Looking to GDP, the BoE forecasts 5% growth in Q2 2021 after a 1.6% contraction in the first quarter. This is slightly above what the Bank predicted in its May report. Even so, this would leave UK GDP some 4% lower than pre-pandemic levels.

GDP growth is forecast at 3% for Q3, in response to thousands of workers needing to isolate after Delta variant COVID-19 cases surged across the UK in recent weeks. However, COVID cases and hospitalisations have broadly fallen in the last month, giving some hope that the “pingdemic” is just a bump on the road to recovery.

According to the MPC, the economy will return to its pre-pandemic levels in the last quarter of the year. The pandemic’s impact is expected to have substantially lessened by then. At this time, GDP growth will cool and return to levels more normally seen in mature economies.

Unwinding QE

Quantitative easing-related purchases will be scaled back once the base rate reaches 0.5%, according to today’s policy outlook. At this time, the Bank will stop investing in maturing UK government bonds, but only if economic conditions are good enough.

This rate is substantially lower than the 1.5% rate earmarked in 2018.

In its policy report, the MPC forecast that its main interest rate would reach 0.5% in the third quarter of 2024, after hitting 0.2% in the third quarter of 2022 and 0.4% for the same period in 2023.

This comes after the Bank of England was recently dubbed “addicted to QE” by a House of Lords committee – something which Governor Bailey strenuously denies.

In all, a fairly positive report for the UK then. Sterling was up around the $1.925 level against the dollar after the Bank’s plans were made public and continued to build momentum at writing.

European stocks mixed ahead of earnings & BoE statement

Investors showed mixed sentiment this morning on a day that promises much in the way of earnings and central bank announcements.

At the time of writing, the FTSE 100 had retreated by over seven points. The DAX and CAC were performing much better, adding 17.8 and 22.38 points respectively. From a pan-European perspective, the Stoxx 50 was trading 17.00 upwards.

Many UK investors are essentially waiting for today’s Bank of England statements. Governor Bailey is due to outline the central bank’s monetary policy at midday today. Inflation is expected to be the day’s running theme.

Inflation has so far overshot established target levels for two consecutive months. The Bank’s response will be critical today. So far, there are two schools of thought predicting what the BoE might do. On one side, economists broadly think Bailey will up inflation targets. Investors, on the other hand, believe that the Bank will stick to a dovish tack, leaving its interest and QE stance unchanged.

UK CPI was up 0.5% in June on a month-by-month basis. This was way ahead of estimates and the fastest CPI growth rate reported since May 2018.

It’s likely the Bank of England is still feeling cautiously optimistic. It has predicted that inflation will peak at 3% in 2021 before falling away next year. The BoE says it has yet to see any evidence that the current acceleration in CPI is anything but transitionary.

Despite the surge in Delta variant COVID-19 cases across the last month, UK infection rates have broadly trended down throughout July and August. That gives some hope that the country will be able to return to full normality quicker than other economies. Pretty much all restrictions have been removed.

Ahead of today’s BoE announcement, GBP/USD had recaptured the 1.390 level. At the time of writing, cable had reached 1.394 and was up 0.19% on the day. Its future course will be decided later when we get more info on the Bank of England’s QE bond-buying stance.

EUR/USD had stayed mostly flat at 1.1837.

In terms of earnings, European large caps reporting today include Siemens, Adidas, Merck, Bayer, Intesa Sanpaolo and WPP.

Looking to US markets, the Nasdaq was showing positive movements, trending up nearly 20 points. The Dow Jones and S&P 500, however, were down pre-market, with the Dow sliding 0.9%. The S&P 500’s downward trend was in the 0.5% region at the time of writing.

On Wall Street, large caps reporting include Square and Virgin Galactic. You can find a rundown of the companies sharing earnings today with our US earnings season calendar.

Adelanto semanal: todas las miradas pendientes del informe laboral de EE. UU.

La semana entrante no será ociosa para los mercados: marcado en rojo en la agenda están las nóminas no agrícolas de EE. UU., así como las declaraciones de dos importantes bancos centrales.

Empecemos con la última publicación de las nóminas no agrícolas estadounidenses.

En junio, estos datos superaron por mucho las expectativas, por lo que los mercados estarán más atentos que nunca cuando salgan a la luz el viernes.

El mes pasado, se crearon 850 000 puestos de trabajo en la economía estadounidense, un dato muy superior a los 720 000 previstos. Asimismo, junio fue el sexto mes consecutivo de creación de puestos de trabajo.

Sin embargo, la tasa de desempleo ascendió del 5,8 % al 5,9 %, cuando las previsiones apuntaban a una caída hasta el 5,6%. La tasa de actividad, el parámetro de cabecera para medir la escasez de mano de obra en todo el país, se mantuvo en el 61,6 %.

En general, parece que las contrataciones han caído ligeramente durante la primavera y se debe a varios motivos: los temores por el virus, los costes derivados del cuidado de niños, mejores seguros por desempleo, y los planes de estímulo y de regulación de empleo temporal. Sin embargo, se ha constatado que algunas empresas han aumentado los salarios de sus empleados para incentivarlos a que ocupen nuevos puestos.

La tasa de empleo también constituye un parámetro importante para el Presidente de la Fed, Jerome Powell, a la hora de evaluar los niveles de estímulo y soporte a la economía del país.

Ya sabemos que Powell y compañía se muestran relativamente cómodos con dejar que la economía siga creciendo a este ritmo, aun a pesar de la creciente inflación. Como apuntó Powell en la última reunión de la Fed, aún se deben crear otros 7,5 millones de puestos de trabajo en EE. UU., aunque algunos informes sugieren que esta cifra es de 6,8 millones. Hasta que no se alcance este hito, se espera más estímulo y soporte económico de la Fed.

En el ámbito de los índices, el S&P 500 y el Nasdaq respondieron con nuevos máximos históricos a los buenos datos del informe laboral del mes pasado. Los operadores de índices albergarán esperanzas a que ocurra algo similar con los datos de julio.

Seguimos con los datos relativos a EE. UU.: el ISM, uno de los principales emisores de informes del índice de gestores de compras (PMI) en EE. UU., dará a conocer sus perspectivas sobre el sector servicios y el manufacturero esta semana.

Según el informe sobre el PMI del ISM, el sector manufacturero de EE. UU. se mantuvo firme el mes pasado, aunque los problemas en la cadena de suministro siguen reprimiendo el crecimiento. El PMI manufacturero fue de 60,6 puntos, inferior a los 61,2 puntos de mayo.

El impulso sigue siendo fuerte: cuatro de los cinco subíndices calculados por el ISM mostraron un crecimiento elevado. A pesar del aumento de precios, el interés de los consumidores por nuevos productos sigue siendo alto. Sin embargo, la falta de mano de obra, junto con el aumento de los precios en materias primas y materiales, se ha traducido en estancamientos y escasez mientras los fabricantes tienen dificultades para satisfacer la demanda.

«Tiempos de entrega de materias primas prolongados nunca vistos, escasez a gran escala de materiales básicos esenciales, aumento en los precios de materias primas y dificultades en el transporte de productos son factores que continúan afectando a todos los segmentos de la economía manufacturera», sentenció Timothy Fiore, presidente del Comité de estudios de empresas manufactureras del ISM.

Lo mismo se aplica al sector servicios: creció en junio, pero a un ritmo mucho menor que en mayo, cuando alcanzó cotas nunca vistas. En este caso, el índice cayó de 63,5 a 60,1 puntos.

«La tasa de crecimiento en el sector servicios se mantiene sólida, a pesar de su moderada contracción con respecto al máximo histórico del mes anterior», explicó Anthony Nieves, presidente del Comité de estudios de empresas de servicios, quien concluye: «Los problemas con la escasez de materiales, la inflación, la logística, y los recursos laborales siguen obstaculizando las condiciones comerciales».

Mantener ese impulso es la máxima prioridad para garantizar la salud económica de EE. UU., sobre todo porque se espera que el país sea el motor que impulse la recuperación económica mundial a partir de este año.

Dejamos atrás los datos para abordar las declaraciones que ofrecerán dos bancos centrales la próxima semana.

Empezamos con el Banco de Inglaterra (BoE), cuyo principal tema de interés es el aumento de la inflación.

En junio, la inflación alcanzó el 2,5 %, debido al aumento generalizado en los precios de los bienes de consumo. Esto podría justificarse por que la demanda contenida en la economía británica por fin se desató. Sin embargo, actualmente, la inflación se encuentra en su nivel más alto en tres años, algo que inquieta a los economistas.

El gobernador Bailey ya ha dejado claro cuál es su postura: los aumentos de precio son temporales y podrían alcanzar el 3 % para finales de año. A partir de entonces, deberían retroceder a niveles razonables. Actualmente, la misión del BoE es dirigir la inflación al 2 % y mantenerla a ese nivel.

Sin embargo, Bailey ha afirmado que subiría los tipos si la inflación se descontrola.

El Banco de la Reserva de Australia (RBA) también dará a conocer su última valoración de la política y su rumbo de acción esta semana.

Todo apunta a que no se anunciarán cambios importantes. El gobernador Philip Lowe lo ha dejado muy claro: no se subirán los tipos hasta, por lo menos, 2024, a pesar de los sólidos indicadores económicos fundamentales del país.

El mínimo histórico del 0,1 % del tipo de efectivo se mantendrá en ese nivel. Sin embargo, en la reunión de julio se abordaron algunos ajustes en el programa de compra de bonos de Australia. La escala de las compras se ha reducido: a partir de septiembre, incluido, el ritmo de compra de bonos del RBA pasará de 5000 millones a 4000 millones de AUD a la semana.

Lowe ha sentado las bases para más cambios en esta política. Veremos qué más cambios a pequeña escala deparará la reunión de esta semana.

Por último, pero no por ello menos importante, repasaremos las novedades de la temporada de ganancias en EE. UU.

La tercera semana de informes de resultados del 2T de 2021 de empresas de gran capitalización dará comienzo el lunes. En comparación con la vorágine de informes de la semana pasada, esta será una semana con un ritmo más pausado en la que saldrán a luz los resultados de algunas empresas importantes, como Alibaba o Uber.

A continuación, encontrará más información sobre las grandes empresas que publicarán sus resultados esta semana, aunque también puede consultar nuestro calendario de resultados en EE. UU.

Principales datos económicos

Date Time (GMT+1) Asset Event
Mon 2-Aug 8.55am EUR German Final Manufacturing PMI
  3.00pm USD US ISM Manufacturing PMI
 
Tue 3-Aug 5.30am AUD RBA Rate Statement
  5.30am AUD Cash Statement
  11.45pm NZD Employment Change q/q
  11.45pm NZD Unemployment Rate
 
Wed 4-Aug 2.30am AUD Retail Sales m/m
  1.15pm USD ADP Nonfarm Employment Change
  3.00pm USD US ISM Services PMI
  3.30pm OIL US Crude Oil Inventories
 
Thu 5-Aug 12.00pm GBP Asset Purchase Facility
  12.00pm GBP BOE Monetary Policy Report
  12.00pm GBP MPC Asset Purchase Facility Votes
  12.00pm GBP Monetary Policy Summary
  12.00pm GBP MPC Official Bank Rate Votes
  12.00pm GBP Official Bank Rate
  3.30pm GAS US Natural Gas Inventories
 
Fri 6-Aug 2.30am AUD RBA Monetary Policy Statement
  1.30pm CAD Employment Change
  1.30pm CAD Unemployment Rate
  1.30pm USD Average Hourly Earnings q/q
  1.30pm USD Nonfarm Employment Change
  1.30pm USD Unemployment Rate

 

Principales informes de resultados

Mon 2 Aug Tue 3 Aug Wed 4 Aug Thu 5 Aug
Arista Networks Alibaba General Motors Ball Corp
Activision Blizzard The Kraft Heinz Co Beyond Meat
Roku Inc Illumina
Uber Technologies Square Inc
The Trade Desk
Virgin Galactic Holdings

European stocks edge higher, BoE meeting ahead

Stocks seem to be largely marking time until there is more clarity on economic data like inflation with the major European bourses a little higher this morning but well within ranges. Bonds are steady with US 10s around 1.5% and stocks are likely to remain similarly directionless until the former start to motor. Wednesday saw US indices essentially flat but they remain +1% higher on the week after a sharp turnaround from the Fed-induced selling last week. The Nasdaq rose marginally to notch another record high with subdued bond yields allowing investors to get back into big tech growth. More Fed speakers today to watch for in the shape of Bostic, Harker, Williams, Bullard and Barkin but the sentiment seems to be that if the Fed is going to more mindful of inflation than was judged for most of the last year then it ought to keep control of yields and allow for gently rising stock markets. I’d still be mindful of a tantrum later this year when yields ought to pick up some steam. 

 

Sterling trades close to $1.40 ahead of the Bank of England monetary policy statement today. As detailed in our preview, no change is expected but there are signs that inflation might run hotter than the MPC currently forecasts so we will be watching for any commentary around this. Yesterday’s UK PMI report pointed to strong inflationary pressures that will take CPI above the bank’s 2% target – the question is how far above and for how long – and how does the Bank respond. Bailey has made clear the MPC won’t tolerate above-target inflation for long. Could he spring a hawkish surprise today and say something like ‘inflation pressures are building and the bank has the tools to respond’?  I don’t think this is the time yet to do this, but that’s why it would be a surprise.

 

GBPUSD: near term resistance at the 1.40 round number, support holding on the 100-day line at 1.3950.

WTI made a fresh high above $74 amid ongoing expectations that restrained supply and improving demand is leading to an increasingly tight crude market. Yesterday the EIA reported crude oil stocks declined by 7.6m. Stocks at the Cushing, Oklahoma hub fell to their lowest since March 2020 and US total petroleum demand rose 20.75m bpd, getting close to pre-pandemic levels. Meanwhile OPEC is signalling a stronger oil market. Chatter is that the cartel will increase production by 500,000 bpd from August as they continue to cautiously unwind production curbs. 

 

Copper has staged a bit of comeback this week but there are some bearish indicators on the physical supply front with China releasing metal from reserves to counter rising inflation. Wednesday saw a bounce in copper as the release of 100,000 tonnes of base metals was less than expected, but this is being reversed. Import demand in the country is also reported to be the weakest since 2017, whilst LME stockpiles are 30% higher this month.  

 

Bitcoin futures just running into resistance at the 200-day line, which had acted as support during recent plunges.

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