US GDP growth stumbles in Q2

A slower-than-expected rise in GDP cools expectations of US economic growth this year. But is it all doom and gloom?

US GDP

Slowing American GDP growth disappoints markets

Despite estimates forecasting another surging quarter for the US economy, annualised GDP growth failed to match the Dow Jones estimate of 8.4%.

GPD instead rose 6.5% in Q2 2021 according to the US Commerce Department’s initial reading today. Q1’s gross domestic product was downrated slightly to 6.3%.

So, a disappointing quarter which promised so much. Markets were expecting the US economy to surge as pent up demand gets unleashed. That hasn’t happened.

Even so, 6.5% is still pretty rapid expansion for a mature economy like the US.

We’ve seen in July PMI releases that economic activity in the manufacturing and services sectors dropped off compared with June. Higher prices of raw materials, and a labour shortage, all contributed to the lower output. Let’s be clear: the readings still showed growth, at 60.6 and 60.1 respectively, but it appears to be cooling off.

Other factors are at play here too. The delta variant appears to be running rampant throughout the southern states. Surging prices caused by inflation has weakened purchasing power. The impact of the huge fiscal stimulus provided by the Biden Administration is starting to wear off.

The labour market, in particular, has struggled to reach its pre-pandemic levels. There remains a gap of about 6.8 million jobs missing from the sector pre-market. This comes despite last months’ bumper nonfarm payrolls print when 850,000 new jobs were added to the US economy.

400,000 new unemployment insurance claims were filed in the week ending July 24th. That’s roughly double the pre-pandemic level. Continuing claims now floats around the 3.27 million mark.

The outlook for the next quarter, based on these stats, has diminished. Some estimates forecast 3.5% growth – not exactly the fire-breathing rapid rise we were anticipating.

Private domestic investment fell by 3.5% in the last quarter. Federal spending also dropped 5%. A rise in imports was also noted.

Are there any positives regarding this quarter’s US GDP growth?

Actually, yes.

With the latest estimates, the US GDP is now above pre-pandemic levels, indicating there are still strong fundamentals powering the economy along.

Personal savings essentially halved during the review period from $4.1 trillion to $1.97 trillion. Consumers stashing savings isn’t a good thing for sophisticated economies, so it was encouraging to see consumers spend.

Inf act, 69% of all economic activity in the US during Q2 2021 was driven by consumer spending, according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis. During the review period, it jumped up 11.7%.

The US economy has come on leaps and bounds since the first Covid shutdown. At its lowest point, gross economic output slumped 31.4% in Q2 2020. After that, it rebounded 33.4% and has continued on a growth footing ever since.

If we remove Covid-19 and its economic effects from the equation, current second quarter GDP growth would represent the fastest rate since 2003.

So, there is some room for optimism – but be sure to temper it with the realisation we’ve probably seen peak recovery for this year already. It’s like that growth will slow throughout the rest of the year as the economy fully resets.

Week Ahead: The Fed meets as inflation bites

Week Ahead

The Fed meets as inflation starts to bite into the US economy. Will we see any major changes from Powell and co? US GDP is in focus too with forecasts calling for more record quarterly growth. Meanwhile, Tesla hits the accelerator on the busiest US earnings season week so far this quarter.

Earnings reports aside, the week’s big event is July’s FOMC meeting.

Inflation and a hot-running economy are likely to take centre stage during July’s talks. We’ve recently seen Chairman Powell pledge “powerful support” for the US economy post-pandemic amidst a backdrop of rising inflation.

According to Powell, current rising consumer prices is down to the nation’s reopening and will fade. In a testimony to the US House of Representatives, Powell stuck to the jobs script, pointing out there is still 7.5 million jobs missing from the US’ pre-pandemic economy.

A reduction in stimulus is some way off, according to Powell. The Fed’s $120bn a month bond purchasing programme is probably not going to change. As mentioned above, this is tied in with labour markets. Bond-buying and Fed support will likely remain in place until those job gaps are filled.

No rate hike is expected until 2023 at the earliest.

But for all the Fed’s talk of inflation being broad-based, stemming from heightened economic activity, many remain unconvinced on the plan to let the economy run hot.

June’s headline CPI print of 5.4% was the highest reading for nearly 13 years. Observers on both the Democratic and Republic side will be hoping this can be tamed relatively soon.

Powell has promised that if inflation runs rampant, “we will use our tools to guide inflation back down.”

But “it would be a mistake to act prematurely.”

Sticking with the US economy, we are due the first reading of the nation’s Q2 GDP on Thursday.

So far, predictions are good. Deloitte cites technological advances may help power the US towards another bumper quarter – outstripping pre-pandemic growth levels.

The Conference Board has predicted the US economy will grow at an annualised 9% in 2021’s second quarter.

“As the economy fully reopens and consumer confidence continues to rise, we expect consumer spending to help drive the recovery forward – especially spending on in-person services,” TCB said. “These outlays will be underpinned by a strengthening labour market and a large pool of savings derived from three rounds of fiscal stimulus checks dispersed over the last year.”

We’ve also seen in previous PMI releases that manufacturing and services sectors have continued to act on a growth footing into June following a strong April and May. Three months of solid PMI performance should help power US GDP growth this quarter.

But again, all of this pent up demand being unleashed is leading into the higher core consumer goods prices the US is currently experiencing. We’ve also had reports of high input prices starting to affect manufacturing output too. June’s manufacturing PMI reading was actually slightly lower than May’s for instance.

But, if predictions are correct, the US is about to experience one of its best periods of quarterly growth since the Second World War.

Moving away from data, it’s the busiest week for earnings season this quarter so far.

Nearly 40 US large caps are due to share their Q2 earnings this week. This includes the bulk of the FAANG stocks. Netflix reported last week, but these remaining tech giants, Alphabet (Google), Amazon, Facebook, and Apple, are all reporting in.

Tesla, however, kicks off proceedings with its earnings summary coming on Monday after US market close.

This is interesting because Tesla has rocketed 330% in terms of share price between May 2020-May 2021 and traditionally share prices tend to rise prior to Tesla releases. They have done so at an average of 1.6% ahead of all quarterly releases for the past three years.

Elon Musk’s carmaker has much to celebrate this quarter. It delivered 200,000 in a quarter for the first time. Tesla has also unleashed a range of new automation services, based on an $199-per month subscription service.

Earnings forecasts are strong, but we’ll know more on Monday.

For more information on which large caps are reporting, be sure to check out our US earnings calendar.

Major economic data

Date Time (GMT+1) Asset Event
Mon 26-Jul 9.00am EUR German ifo Business Climate
 
Tue 27-Jul 3.00pm USD US Consumer Confidence
 
Wed 28-Jul 2.30am AUD CPI q/q
  2.30am AUD Trimmed Mean CPI q/q
  1.30pm CAD CPI m/m
  3.30pm OIL US Crude Oil Inventories
  7.00pm USD FOMC Statement
  7.00pm USD Federal Funds Rate
  7.30pm USD FOMC Press Conference
 
Thu 29-Jul 1.30pm USD Advanced GDP q/q
  3.30pm GAS US Natural Gas Inventories
 
Fr 30-Jul 9.00am EUR Germany Preliminary GDP q/q
  1.30pm CAD GDP m/m
  1.30pm USD Core PCE Price Index m/m

 

Key earnings data

Mon 26 Jul Tue 27 Jul Wed 28 Jul Thu 29 Jul Fri 30 Jul
Tesla 3M Automatic Data Processing CME AbbVie
General Electric Boeing Keurig Dr Pepper Aon
Advanced Micro Devices McDonald’s Mastercard Caterpillar
Alphabet (Google) Pfizer Merck Chevron
Apple Shopify Amazon Exxon Mobil
Microsoft Spotify Gilead Procter & Gamble
Mondelez Facebook Liberty Global Takeda Pharmaceutical
Starbucks Ford Pinterest Berkshire Hathaway
Teladoc Health PayPal Twilio
Visa Qualcomm

 

Week Ahead: US GDP and consumer confidence shake as inflationary pressure grows

Week Ahead

It’s relatively quiet in terms of major announcements this week. The bulk of the key market-moving data will be coming from the US, as preliminary quarterly GDP figures are released alongside the latest CB consumer confidence sentiment. Both will be enlightening as to US economic sentiment as inflation stops lurking in the background and comes to the fore. 

We start, though, with New Zealand. The Reserve Bank of New Zealand’s latest cash rate decision and statement is due early on Wednesday morning. No major changes are expected to the current official cash rate (OCR) of 0.25%, although inflationary pressures look like they are starting to make their mark on New Zealand’s economy.  

RBNZ targets 2% inflation, which may have already been breached.  

“We are forecasting a 0.6% increase for the quarter yielding 2.6% annual inflation. Another way of thinking about this is that CPI inflation for the three quarters to March 2021 was already 2.0%,” says Bank of New Zealand’s Head of Research Stephen Toplis. 

While inflation is probably already here, the likelihood of a rate hike is low. ANZ’s Chief Economist Sharon Zollner and senior strategist David Croy suggest rates won’t rise until August 2022, rising to 0.75%. The pair also predict a further two rate increases across 2023, culminating in a final 1.75% figure.  

Looking to US data, preliminary q/q GDP figures are released on Thursday, following up the advance reading from late April. At 6.4%, annualised US GDP growth was the second-largest since 2003, surging as the economy reopens again. Growth was stimulated by numerous sectors, including increased personal consumption, fixed residential and nonresidential investment, and government spending.  

Preliminary readings are the mid stage of the overall GDP reporting process before the final reading is released at the end of the month. The advanced reading is generally the strongest indicator, but revisions to final figures are not uncommon. 

US consumer confidence is in focus too. Friday sees the latest printing of the CB consumer confidence index. April’s reading beat expectations, rising from 109 points in Mach to 121.7. Consumers had more cash in their pockets, thanks to Biden’s stimulus cheques, and were happy to spend it. 

However, inflation could cloud May’s Consumer Board readings. The preliminary reading for the University of Michigan Index of Consumer Sentiment dipped to 82.8 for May from 88.3 in April – a 6.2% month-on-month decline. 

Consumer sentiment has taken a knock due to higher-than-expected headline inflation, recorded at 4.6% in April. This is the sharpest rate of increase since 2008. Headline inflation stood at 2.6% in March. 

Increased consumer spending was a cornerstone of Q1 GDP growth. Should that retract as inflation grows, the calls for the Fed to shake up its monetary policy could become all the more louder as the year rolls on.  

 

Major economic data 

Date  Time (GMT+1)  Currency  Event 
Tue 25-May  9.00am  EUR  German ifo Business Climate 
  3.00pm  USD  US CB Consumer Confidence 
       
Wed 26-May  3.00am  NZD  Official Cash Rate 
  3.00am  NZD  RBNZ Monetary Policy Statement 
  3.00am  NZD  RBNZ Press Statement 
  4.00am  NZD  RBNZ Press Conference 
  3.30pm  USD  US Crude Oil Inventories 
       
Thu 27-May  1.30pm  USD  Preliminary GDP q/q 
  1.30pm  USD  Unemployment claims 
  3.00pm  USD  Pending house sales 
  3.30pm  USD  US Natural Gas Inventories 
       
Fri 28-May  1.30pm  USD  Core PCE Price Index m/m 

 

Key earnings data 

Date  Company  Event 
Tue 25-May  Intuit  Q3 2021 Earnings 
     
Wed 26-May  Nvidia  Q1 2022 Earnings 
     
Thu 27-May  Salesforce  Q1 2022 Earnings 
  Costco  Q3 2021 Earnings 
  Royal Bank of Canada  Q2 2021 Earnings 
  Toronto-Dominion Bank  Q2 2021 Earnings 
     
Fri 28-May  National Bank of Canada  Q2 2021 Earnings 

Week Ahead: Apple and Tesla earnings, Fed meeting and US GDP in focus

Week Ahead

Lots to bite our teeth into this week. We start with the Fed, although we’re not anticipating big things. An optimistic GDP outlook is coming for the US, though, while consumer confidence indicators are on their way.

Elsewhere, China’s manufacturing PMI data is released after 13 months of straight growth.

We’re also looking at another earnings charge as Wall Street reporting season rolls on with Apple, Facebook, Tesla, Alphabet and Microsoft all due to deliver quarterly numbers.

Fed meeting: no major changes ahead

America is gradually getting back to normality. The vaccine roll-out is picking up, people are returning to work and leisure, lockdown restrictions are easing and the economy is surging.

“You can see the economy opening, you can see the riderships [sic] on airplanes going up and people going back to restaurants,” Fed Chair Jerome Powell said in a recent Economic Club interview. “I think we’re going into a period of faster growth and higher job creation and that’s a good thing.”

So, what does this mean for the week’s Fed rate decision? The FOMC meets this week amidst speculation that the current “easy money” strategy may not be the right one.

With three stimulus deals pumping more liquidity into the economy, and historically low rates, ominous inflation war drums are sounding for some. However, we’re not likely to see any wholesale changes this week, with no change expected to rates until at least 2023 and bond purchases continuing at the current pace at least until later this year.

Powell has laid out the criteria for a major policy shift:

  • Effective complete recovery in the labour market
  • Inflation reaching 2%
  • Inflation running above 2% for a sustainable period of time

None of those boxes have been ticked thus far. Even so, jobs numbers are improving. The unemployment rate nudged down to 6% with last nonfarm payrolls. The extra liquidity afforded by Biden’s stimulus deals may also pump up consumer good prices too. Conditions for a rate change are swirling around.

But don’t go into the FOMC press conference expecting a blitz of new policy changes. The course is a steady one from here on out.

US quarterly GDP set to soar as economy roars

With the US economy roaring back to life, US GDP forecasts for the first quarter are electric.

Q4 2020 saw GDP growth revised upward from 4.1% to 4.3% as US consumers splash their stimulus cash. Consumer spending has been the key driver, but other areas of business investment are helping an economic surge. Exports rose 22.3%. Business investment in intellectual property, inventories and residential housing was up too.

All very good – but the real surge could be about to begin. Estimates for Q1 2021 GDP are exceptionally high.

The Atlanta Fed forecasts a whopping 8.3% at its latest GDP estimates dated April 16th. The key driver here is personal income. In January, household wealth increased by $2 trillion, alongside a 2.4% rise in spending. Combined with the other factors at play, like higher nonfarm payrolls, consumer spending, and industrial output, the recipe for high GDP growth is all there.

Extra household stimulus cheques are on their way. As vaccine rollout progresses, and further sectors are opened to individual spending, it’s likely GPD growth will surge. The challenge, then, is sustaining it.

Can US consumer confidence stay high?

It seems highly likely: consumer confidence hit a one-year high in March and things have only improved since then regards vaccines, reopening and stimulus. Given the way the vaccine rollout and economy are performing, this will probably be the case in April too.

Let’s look at March’s data to gauge April sentiment. Last month, consumers were upbeat about the jobs market. They were feeling cheery as restrictions on small-businesses are lifted. The thought of extra free cash from stimulus cheques is lifting the mood.

Big ticket items like cars, houses and household appliances are on US consumers’ shopping lists going forward as a savings glut plus extra government money is increasing spending power.

In point terms, the Confidence Board’s survey jumped 19.3 points to hit 109.7 in March. That’s the highest it has been for a year, and the highest points leap since April 2004.

March’s mood was good. Will we see the same in April?

China manufacturing PMI: can the sector bounce back?

China’s manufacturing PMI data is released this week as the nation’s economic recovery gains traction.

March’s index showed an increase over February’s numbers, rising from 50.6 to 51.9. While growth is still historically low for Chinese manufacturing, a reading over 50 implies the sector is still expanding. In fact, PMIs have shown growth readings for 13 straight months.

Production capacity was closed during Lunar Festival but it’s been back online. This is partly responsible for the PMI rise, but there are more important factors at play. Namely, the global economic recovery.

Orders are up, which means Chinese plants are busier. The US stimulus cheques are feeding into higher demand for consumer goods – great news for Chinese factory owners. Additionally, domestic and international orders of machinery like excavators are helping prop up sectoral growth.

Future prospects are buoyed by big spending plans overseas. Joe Biden’s mammoth infrastructure plan, if it passes, is being hungrily eyed by Chinese construction machinery and materials manufacturers. There’s profit to be had stateside.

China is on course for a bumper first quarter according to China’s National Bureau of Statistics. GDP growth has clocked in at a record 18.3%, following an economic surge that completely outpaces the US stellar growth.

While the short term outlook is encouraging, questions around sustainability remain. Exports, fuel for China’s manufacturing fire, were up 38.7% overall in Q1 2021, but those eye-watering numbers have been tempered by somewhat by the drop in export activity between February and March. A cause for concern to be sure, so this week’s PMI release will be interesting to watch.

Tech-heavy week ahead for earnings season

Wall Street prepares for another earnings barrage this week. As ever in earnings season, the reports are coming thick and fast.

There’s a bit of a tech focus to earnings this week. Apple, Amazon, Facebook, and Tesla are all reporting in. Tesla will be interesting, purely to see the impact its decision to spend billions on bitcoin has had on its financials. Previous reports suggest it has made more profit from the crypto this year then selling cars.

Apple’s financials come after the company’s 2021 launch event. A shiny new colour the iPhone twelve, plus a rainbow of hues for iMacs, Apple TV updates, and more have all been launched – but the focus is very much on iPhone 12 sales. With six out of every ten smartphones sold in Q1 being an iPhone, Apple could be looking at another record breaking quarter.

We also see oil majors ExxonMobil, BP, Shell, TOTAL, and Chevron share earnings, which probably won’t be as colossal as Apple’s. ExxonMobil says resurgent oil prices means figures may be better than expected but could be facing a chilling $800m loss thanks to the Texas Big Freeze. Will we see more hefty losses for the majors?

See below for a roundup of this week’s reporting large caps.

Major economic data

Date  Time (GMT+1)  Currency  Event 
Mon 26-Apr  9.00am  EUR  German IFO Business Climate 
       
Tue 27-Apr  Tentative  JPY  BOJ Outlook Report 
  Tentative  JPY  Monetary Policy Statement 
  Tentative  JPY  BOJ Press Conference 
  3.00pm  USD  CB Consumer Confidence 
       
Wed 28-Apr  All day  All  OPEC-JMMC Meeting 
  2.30am  AUD  CPI q/q 
  2.30am  AUD   Trimmed Mean CPI q/q 
  1.30pm  CAD  Core Retail Sales m/m 
  1.30pm  CAD  Retail Sales m/m 
  3.30pm  USD  US Crude Oil Inventories 
  7.00pm  USD  FOMC Statement 
  7.00pm  USD  Federal Funds Rate 
  7.30pm  USD  FOMC Press Conference 
       
Thu 29-Apr  2.00am  NZD  Final ANZ Business Confidence 
  1.30pm  USD  Advance GDP q/q 
  1.30pm  USD  Advance GPD Index q/q 
  1.30pm  USD  Unemployment claims 
  3.00pm  USD   Pending House Sales 
       
Fri 30-Apr  2.00am  CNY  Manufacturing PMI 
  9.00am  EUR  Germany Prelim GDP q/q 
  1.30pm  CAD  GDP m/m 

 

Key earnings data

Date  Company  Event 
Mon 26-Apr  Tesla  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Vale  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Canadian National Railway Co.  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Philips  Q1 2021 Earnings 
     
Tue 27-Apr  Microsoft  Q3 2021 Earnings 
  Alphabet (Google)  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Visa  Q2 2021 Earnings 
  Novartis  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Texas Instruments  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Starbucks  Q2 2021 Earnings 
  HSBC  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  GE  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  3M  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  AMD  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  BP  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Mondalez  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Chubb  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Capital One  Q1 2021 Earnings 
     
     
Wed 28-Apr  Facebook  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Apple  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  QUALCOMM  Q2 2021 Earnings 
  Boeing  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Moody’s  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  NOVATEK  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Spotify  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Ford Motor Corp  Q1 2021 Earnings 
     
Thu 29-Apr  Amazon  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Samsung  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  MasterCard  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  China Construction Bank  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  McDonald’s  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Royal Dutch Shell  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Bank of China  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Sony  Q4 2020 Earnings 
  Caterpillar  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  TOTAL  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Airbus  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  S&P Global  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Gilead  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Sinopec  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  BASF  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Baidu  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Equinor  Q1 2021 Earnings 
     
Fri 30-Apr  Alibaba  Q4 2020 Earnings 
  ExxonMobil  Q1 2020 Earnings 
  AstraZeneca  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  BNP Paribas  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Colgate-Palmolive  Q1 2021 Earnings 

Week Ahead: Acronyms a-go-go – CPI, PMI & GDP releases

Week Ahead

A lot of economic data is released in key economies this week. Starting with the UK, CPI and retail sales figures are released, with furlough and lockdown still looming large over the economy. US GDP numbers for the first quarter are finalised but the focus will be on business sentiment showing up in a fresh batch of PMI releases from the US, UK and Eurozone amid vaccine progress that is diverging in the major economies.  

UK CPI 

Investors and FX traders will be watching UK inflation figures this week following the Bank of England decision. 

Inflation is in focus in the UK right now, as the effects of rising bond yields, further government economic support via Chancellor Sunak’s “spend now, tax later” budget, and the Bank of England’s response continue to colour the economic picture. 

ONS data shows the latest full-year CPI at 0.9%. Across 2021, the CPI is expected to rise to 1.5% across the year. Some estimates suggest it may even rise to 1.8% by April. 

 CPI inflation for the UK came in at -0.2% monthonmonth in January, down on December’s 0.3%, but the figure was above the -0.4% the market was expecting. 

CPI inflation rose 0.7% year-on-year in January, which is above December’s figure of 0.6% and above the consensus expectation for a reading of 0.6%. January’s upward trend was driven by rising prices of food, transport, and household goods. 

UK Retail Sales 

UK retail sales data is released this week. The latest industry data suggests February was a solid month for the UK’s retail sector, according analysis from KPMG. 

Total sales were up 1% in February on a like-for-like basis against last year’s stats. Importantly, this was a sharp reversal of January’s retail sales, where sales contracted 1.3% against 2020’s figures. 

Driving February’s growth was March’s reopening of schools across England. Spending on non-food items, like school uniforms and stationery, was up as shopper’s fell into the back-to-school trend.

Non-essential stores still remain shuttered in England and will remain so until April 12th. Online sales are benefitting greatly from lockdown, mainly because consumers have no other choice but to use digital outlets to get their non-essential items. Non-food spending accounts for 61% of February sales – up nearly double compared with 31% in February 2020. 

However, overall consumer spending is down, Barclaycard reports, slipping 13.8% y-o-y in February. Lockdown restrictions on hospitality and leisure continue to weigh heavy. No doubt they’ll surge once full lockdown restrictions are removed in June, but until then the sector is going to greatly underperform. 

US, UK, EU PMI 

PMI data is released in major economies this week as the UK, US, and EU share index findings. 

Starting with the UK, observers will be hoping the momentum started in February will continue into March. The IHS Markit/CIPS Composite PMI gave a reading of 49.6 for February, up from an eight-month low of 41.2 in January.  

Some industries are performing above expectation. According to IHS Markit, UK construction was perkier than forecast in February, with the construction PMI at 53.3 from 49.2, as projects halted by Covid-19 were given the green light to continue or begin. Manufacturing continued an upward swing too, rising to 55.1 last month. 

However, services remain disappointing, with the revised February figure chalked up as 49.5 – still below the 50 growth threshold. This is perhaps to be expected. Leisure and hospitality are still heavily restricted, so don’t expect any upward trends in March. 

EU leaders were breathing a little easier after  February’s numbers.  For instance, manufacturing was up to 57.9 in February from 54.8 in January – a 3-year high – led by strong performance from The Netherlands and Germany. 

However, since then the outlook for Europe has deteriorated as Covid cases in France and Germany have spiraled and Italy has entered a fresh lockdown. Survey data may not reflect the recent developments fully. 

Hopping across the Atlantic, the US enjoyed a smash-hit manufacturing PMI in February, blowing the EU’s impressive numbers out the water. The US manufacturing PMI came in at 60.8 – the highest level seen for 3 years. However, that impressive figure may be cooled by issues in the supply chain.  

According to manufacturers surveyed by the Institute for Supply Management (ISM), commodities and component prices are rising. The steel price is up, for instance, which massively affects pricing for the US manufacturing sector. 

US GDP 

The final reading for US Q4 2020 GDP comes this week but all eyes are really on the updated forecasts we are getting for 2021. Last week the Federal Reserve raised its outlook for growth to 6.5% this year, up from 4.2% expected at the time of the December meeting.  

The OECD and several investment banks have also upped their guidance for US growth this year. Therefore, high frequency data like the weekly unemployment claims and personal income and spending figures will be the ones to watch, particularly as the arrival of $1,400 stimulus cheques begins to be felt. 

Markets, however, like to look forward, not backward. Q1 2021’s GDP figures will be very interesting for the market. On that front, the outlook is optimistic. 

Back in December, Goldman upgraded its Q1 2021 GDP figure to 5%, following the passing of $900bn in stimulus. Joe Biden’s further $1.9bn stimulus package has been passed, which may influence the quarter’s GDP movement. 

More recently, the Philadelphia Fed has put Q1 2021 GDP growth at 3.2%, citing a brighter outlook for labour markets, although it has also bumped its inflation expectations up to 2.5% for this quarter’s CPI release. The Atlanta Fed is even more upbeat than its cousin to the north. Its initial Nowcast puts the quarter’s GDP growth at 5.2% – in line with Goldman’s December estimate.  

The point about unemployment raised by Philadelphia is pertinent here. The last Nonfarm payrolls indicated the jobs market was beginning to come off life support, surging 379,000. More people at work suggests more productivity, suggests healthy Q1 GDP growth. 

Essentially, we’re looking at a healthier US economy in 2021 so far. Morgan Stanley has even gone so far as to suggest pre-pandemic GDP growth will kick in as early as the end of March. That might be a bit too ambitious, but it’s an indicator of increased confidence regarding the United States. 

Major economic data 

 

Date  Time (GMT)  Currency  Event 
Wed 24 Mar  7.00am  GBP  UK CPI y/y 
  8.15am  EUR  French Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  8.15am  EUR  French Flash Services PMI 
  8.30am  EUR  German Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  8.30am  EUR  German Flash Services PMI 
  9.00am  EUR  Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  9.00am  EUR  Flash Services PMI 
  9.30am  GBP  Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  9.30am  GBP  Flash Services PMI 
  1.45pm  USD  Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  1.45pm  USD  Flash Services PMI 
  2.30pm  USD  US Crude Oil Inventories 
       
Thu 25 Mar  8.30am  CHF  SNB Monetary Policy Statement 
  12.30pm  USD  Final GDP q/q 
  2.30pm  USD  US Natural Gas Inventories 
       
Fri 26 May  7.00am  GBP  Retail Sales m/m 
  9.00am  EUR  German ifo Business Climate 

 

Key earnings data 

 

Date  Company  Event 
Mon 22 Mar  Saudi Aramco  Q4 2020 Earnings 
        
Tue 23 Mar  Adobe  Q1 2021 Earnings 
   Markit  Q1 2021 Earnings 
        
Wed 24 Mar  Tencent Holdings  Q4 2020 Earnings 
   Geely Motors  Q4 2020 Earnings 
        
Thu 25 Mar  CNOOC  Q4 2020 Earnings 

Week Ahead: Fed meets, US GDP & Big Tech earnings

Week Ahead

In the week ahead, the Federal Reserve holds its first meeting of the new year, with a range of new appointments in place, but a major policy change seems unlikely. Latest US GDP figures are released too. Forecasts are showing a mixed but optimistic outlook for Q4 2020’s numbers. Finally, earnings season continues with big tech firms leading the large caps in the latest earnings calls. 

FOMC meeting & press conference 

The first Federal Reserve meeting of 2021 goes ahead next week, off the back of newly inaugurated Joe Biden’s plans for additional stimulus and Treasury pick Janet Yellen’s calls to ‘act big’ on fiscal policy. $1.9 trillion is the ballpark figure for additional economic stimulus as the US seeks to shore up its economy against the continued Covid-19 onslaught. 

Four new regional Fed presidents are being rotated into the key voting spots this January – a rotation that could indicate a more dovish Fed for 2021. Out go Mester (hawk), Kashkari (dove), Kaplan (neutral) and Harker (neutral). In come Evans (dovish), Daly (neutral), Bostic (dove), and Barkin (neutral).  

New members provide a little interest, but the Fed is not about to change course, with Jay Powell making it clear that now is not the time to talk about tapering bond purchases, although some policymakers have suggested this may be warranted later in 2021. 

According to December 2020’s Fed meeting minutes, policymakers see rates staying in the 0%-0.25% currently targeted range until 2022, with a long-range estimate of 2.5%. No one foresees a rate hike this year. The status quo is very much in favour. According to Atlanta Fed President Bostic, a lot would have to happen for that to occur. 

There is a possibility of some increases in 2023, and maybe even as early as the second half of 2022. Three key points will be looked at: the health of small businesses, the effect of Fed lending programmes, many of which were closed by the end of 2020, and temporary vs permanent job losses. Overriding all of those though will be the continued response to the Covid-19 pandemic.  

Right now, it appears that the Fed will essentially be staying the course, committing to policy established across the course of 2020. 

Latest US GDP figures released

Like pretty much every advanced economy worldwide, the US was rocked by repeated blows from the Covid-19 pandemic. Thursday sees the advanced reading of Q4 GDP stats and the picture looks muddled to say the least. GDP diagnoses really depend on who you ask. 

The Atlanta Fed’s GDPNow model forecasts 7.4% annualised growth in Q4 as of its January 15th release, although this has been revised down from 8.7% forecast on January 8th., The New York Fed’s Nowcast model indicates 2.5% expansion.  

GDP growth will all depend on which economic sectors can back on their feet fastest. The US Commerce Department stated recently that consumer spending, the US main economic engine, had been revised upward slightly, alongside fixed business investments. However, these were tempered by a drop in exports. Services, where 61% of consumer spending goes, were down 17% year-on-year in third quarter of 2020 – can they recover? Time will tell.  

Earnings Season – Apple, Microsoft and Facebook lead the large caps 

Earnings season continues on Wall Street and this week the focus shifts to tech giants. Big tech seems like it’s getting bigger and bigger with lockdowns playing into the sector’s hands. Will earnings reports confirm that? 

Apple could be onto its first-ever $100bn quarter as the consensus EPS climbs 12% year-on-year to $1.40. Holiday shopping season falls squarely into Apple’s first-quarter reporting, and with a multitude of iPhone 12 models hitting markets – enough for 30% rise in production numbers this quarter – the indicators a bumper earnings call coming from the California tech giants are pretty strong. 

Microsoft has been a winner. If you’re working from home, you’ve probably had to grapple with Microsoft Teams, now the de facto business communications software of choice for businesses around the globe.  

Cloud computing solutions are helping Microsoft push record quarterly revenues. With the increased uptake of products like Azure, GitHub, SQL Server, and Windows Server, commercial cloud services have generated 31% more revenue y-o-y in the recent quarter, hitting $15.2bn. Combined with its other productivity-led software, i.e. Office, Teams, etc., Microsoft Q1 2021 revenues are on course to reach $40.2bn.  

Facebook’s reputation has taken a bit of a hit in recent months. The spread of fake news and hate speech on the platform is one of the major complaints levelled at the company. 

Despite this, Facebook reported 12% growth in active daily users in the last quarter, up to 1.82bn, while monthly active users grew at the same rate, reaching 2.74bn – just over a quarter of the global population. Ad revenues are up 22% yoy too, even in the face of a boycott from 1,000 prominent advertisers. 

See below for a full breakdown of the large caps reporting earnings this week. 

Major Economic Data 

Date  Time (GMT)  Currency  Event 
Mon Jan 25       
       
Tue Jan 26  7.00am  GBP  Unemployment Claims 
       
  3.00pm  USD  CB Consumer Confidence 
       
Wed Jan 27  12.30am  AUD  CPI q/q 
       
  3.30pm  USD  US Crude Oil Inventories 
       
  7.00pm  USD  FOMC Statement 
       
  7.00pm  USD  Federal Funds Rate 
       
  7.30pm  USD  FOMC Press Conference 
       
Thu Jan 28  1.30pm  USD  Advanced GDP q/q 
       
  1.30pm  USD  Advanced GDP Price Index q/q 
       
  3.00pm  USD  CB Leading Index m/m 
       
  3.30pm  USD  US Natural Gas Inventories 
       
Fri Jan 29  8.00pm  CHF  KOF Economic Barometer 
       
  1.30pm  CAD  GDP m/m 
       
  2.45pm  USD  Chicago PMI 
       
  3.00pm  USD  Pending Home Sales m/m 

 

Key Earnings Data 

Date  Company 
Mon 25 Jan  NIDEC  
  Philips 
  Kimberely-Clark 
  ADM 
  Graco Inc. 
  Brown & Brown 
  Equity Lifestyle Properties 
   
Tue 26 Jan  Microsoft 
  Visa 
  Johnson & Johnson 
  LVMH 
  Verizon 
  Novartis 
  NextEra Energy 
  Texas Instruments 
  Starbucks 
  AMD 
  United Technologies 
  American Express 
  General Electric 
  3M 
  Lockheed Martin 
  Canadian National Railway Co. 
  UBS 
  Capital One 
  Prologis 
  Rockwell Automation 
  PACCAR 
  D.R. Horton 
  Maxim Integrated Products 
  Epiroc 
  LG Household & Health Care 
  EQT AB 
  SGS SA 
  Varian 
  Boston Properties 
  Jacobs 
  Nitto Denko Corp. 
  Metro Inc. 
  C.H. Robinson 
  Disco Corp. 
  F5 Networks 
  W.R. Berkley 
  OBIC 
   
Wed 27 Jan  Apple 
  Tesla 
  Facebook 
  AT&T 
  Abbott Laboratories 
  Boeing 
  ServiceNow 
  Stryker 
  Lam Research 
  Anthem 
  Shin-Etsu Chemical Co. 
  Blackstone 
  Automatic Data Processing Inc. 
  Crown Castle 
  Norfolk Southern Corp. 
  Edward Lifesciences Corp. 
  FANUC CORPORATION 
  MediaTek 
  Lonza AG 
  CPR 
  General Dynamics 
  TE Connectivity Ltd 
  Las Vegas Sands Corp. 
  Amphenol Corp. 
  ITC Ltd. 
  Xilinx Inc. 
  V.F Corp 
  Corning Inc. 
  Axis Bank 
  Ameriprise Financial Inc. 
  Hormel Foods Corp. 
  Teradyne 
  Nasdaq Inc. 
  Nomura Research Institute 
  Essity AB 
  Cheil Industries 
  MarketAxess Holdings 
  Hologic 
  Omron  
  United Rentals 
  Rollins Inc. 
  PTC Inc 
  Duke Realty 
  Teledyne Technologies 
  Raymond James Financial 
  Cree Inc. 
  Packaging Corp. of America 
  Whirlpool 
  Textron 
  MKS Instruments 
  Hess Corp. 
   
Thu 28 Jan  Samsung 
  Mastercard 
  Comcast 
  Danaher 
  McDonald’s 
  Diageo 
  Mondelez 
  Altria 
  Sherwin-Williams 
  Air Products & Chemicals 
  Atlassian 
  Northrop Grumman 
  HOYA 
  Dow 
  Walgreens Boots Alliance 
  T. Rowe 
  Xcel Energy 
  ResMed 
  Fujitsu 
  Hyundai 
  Stanley Black & Decker 
  Southwest Airlines 
  Skyworks Solutions 
  McCormick & Co. 
  Rogers Communications 
  Arthur J. Gallagher & Co. 
  Canon 
  UPM-Kymmene 
  Dover Corp. 
  Advantest 
  Nucor 
  Western Digital 
  Celanese Corp. 
  NVR Inc. 
  Principal 
  Eastman 
  PulteGroup 
  WestRock Co. 
   
Fri 29 Jan  Eli Lilly 
  SAP 
  Honeywell 
  Keyence 
  Charter Communications 
  Caterpillar 
  SK Hynix 
  Colgate-Palmolive 
  M3 
  Atlas Copco 
  Ericsson 
  Johnson Controls 
  H&M 
  Phillips 66 
  BBVA 
  Simon Property Group 
  Astellas Pharmacy 
  Simens Gamsea 
  Komatsu 
  LyondellBasell 
  WeyerHauser 
  LG Electronics 
  Synchrony Financial 
  Church & Dwight Co. 
  Sun Pharmaceutical 
  SG Holdings 
  Telia 
  CAIXABANK 
  NEC 
  Svenska Cellulosa AB 
  Booz Allen Hamilton 

 

 

 

Week Ahead: Big tech earnings to drive pre-election volatility

Week Ahead

It’s set to be a volatile week for US markets as earnings season continues on Wall Street with Big Tech reporting. Apple, Amazon, Microsoft, Alphabet and Facebook are among the biggest names delivering their quarterly updates. Meanwhile central banks are in action aplenty with the Bank of Japan, Bank of Canada and European Central Bank all holding policy meetings. And we of course countdown to November’s US presidential election with all eyes on the Vix. 

Big Tech Earnings 

It’s a massive week for corporate earnings and the focus will undoubtedly fall on  the FAANGs with Apple (AAPL), Amazon (AMZN), Alphabet (GOOGL) and Facebook (FB) all set to report quarterly earnings figures on Thursday. Earnings come amid scrutiny on big tech as the US Department of Justice opened an antitrust case against Google’s parent company, Alphabet, which focuses on agreements it has made with handset manufacturers and carriers to be the default search engine on new phones. Whilst investors have shrugged this off so far, earnings may well provide fuel for greater volatility in the stock. 

Meanwhile there are fears that the case could create headwinds for Apple’s services business. The DOJ said Apple earns between $8 billion and $12 billion from Google, which would equate to between 17% and 26% of Apple’s revenues from Services last year. Apple recently released its iPhone12 but increasingly the reason for the stock’s higher multiples is about the ecosystem and Services revenues. Nevertheless, analysts remain bullish on these tech giants and they remain among the biggest winners YTDMicrosoft reports on Tuesday and there are dozens of large cap stocks reporting over the next few days. 

ECB  

With the euro gaining ground again versus the US dollar, attention in the FX markets will be on the European Central Bank (ECB) meeting on Thursday. Markets are increasingly betting on the ECB carrying out further easing in a bid to boost faltering economic growth and stagnant prices. The Eurozone slid into its second straight month of deflation in September and with further lockdowns being imposed across the bloc, the risks to the economic outlook have clearly deteriorated since the last meeting. The threat of a double dip recession is real, with Christine Lagarde saying recently that the resurgence of the virus is a clear risk to the economy. Given the murky outlook and dreadful inflation backdrop it seems all but certain the ECB will increase its bond buying programme by another €500bn by December. 

To get a flavour of the mood in the ECB, the usually hawkish Austrian central bank head Robert Holzmann, said recently: “More durable, extensive or strict containment measures will likely require more monetary and fiscal accommodation in the short run.” 

Meanwhile there are also meetings of the Bank of Japan and Bank of Canada taking place this week. 

Economic Data 

The advanced reading for US GDP growth in the third quarter will be the highlight as markets look for clues to the pace and sustainability of the recovery.  The economy is expected growth in the region of 30% as businesses reopened following lockdowns. The Atlanta Fed’s forecast indicates the economy will have expanded by 35% on a quarterly basis – but this of course masks the real damage when it’s coming off the back of a 31% drop in Q2. The GDP reading comes at an opportune moment for Donald Trump who will be able to proclaim that the economy is on fire. 

Election Watch 

The final straight: polling data may not change much – the number of undecided voters has been small. Biden commands a strong national lead but in the key battlegrounds that will determine the result it’s tighter. We’re hosting a special pre-election live event on Nov 2nd to run through how the markets might react.  

Top Economic Data This Week

Open the economic calendar in the platform for a full list of events.

Date  Event 
Oct 26th  German Ifo business climate 
Oct 26th  UK Nationwide house price index 
Oct 26th  US new home sales  
Oct 26th  SNB Chairman Jordan speaks 
Oct 27th  BoJ core CPI 
Oct 27th  US durable goods, core durable goods 
Oct 27th  US CB consumer confidence 
Oct 28th  Australia CPI inflation 
Oct 28th  Bank of Canada rate decision 
Oct 28th  EIA crude oil inventories 
Oct 28th  FOMC member Kaplan speaks 
Oct 29th  Bank of Japan policy statement & economic outlook 
Oct 29th  German preliminary CPI inflation 
Oct 29th  UK mortgage approvals & lending figures 
Oct 29th  US advanced GDP – Q3 
Oct 29th  US weekly jobless claims 
Oct 29th  ECB policy decision & press conference 
Oct 29th  US pending home sales 
Oct 29th  US natural gas storage 
Oct 30th  Tokyo core CPI 
Oct 30th  Japan industrial production 
Oct 30th  French flash GDP 
Oct 30th  German preliminary GDP 
Oct 30th  Eurozone CPI flash estimates 
Oct 30th  Canada GDP 
Oct 30th  US personal spending & core PCE price index 
Oct 30th  Chicago PMI 
Oct 30th  UoM consumer sentiment 

 

Top Earnings Reports This Week

Don’t forget to tune into our Daily Earnings Season Specials on XRay for more updates

Date  Company  Event 
26-Oct  SAP SE  Q3 2020 Earnings 
27-Oct  Microsoft Corp.  Q1 2021 Earnings 
27-Oct  Pfizer Inc.  Q3 2020 Earnings 
27-Oct  Ping An Insurance Co.  Q3 2020 Earnings 
27-Oct  Merck Co.  Q3 2020 Earnings 
27-Oct  Novartis AG  Q3 2020 Earnings 
27-Oct  Eli Lilly and Co.  Q3 2020 Earnings 
27-Oct  3M Co.  Q3 2020 Earnings 
27-Oct  AMD (Advanced Micro Devices) Inc.  Q3 2020 Earnings 
27-Oct  Caterpillar Inc.  Q3 2020 Earnings 
27-Oct  HSBC Holdings plc  Q3 2020 Earnings 
27-Oct  S&P Global Inc  Q3 2020 Earnings 
27-Oct  BP plc   Q3 2020 Earnings 
28-Oct  Visa Inc.  Q4 2020 Earnings 
28-Oct  MasterCard Inc.  Q3 2020 Earnings 
28-Oct  United Parcel Service Inc. (UPS)  Q3 2020 Earnings 
28-Oct  Amgen Inc.  Q3 2020 Earnings 
28-Oct  ServiceNow Inc  Q3 2020 Earnings 
28-Oct  Boeing Co.  Q3 2020 Earnings 
28-Oct  Sony Corp.  Q2 2020 Earnings 
28-Oct  GlaxoSmithKline plc (GSK)  Q3 2020 Earnings 
28-Oct  Gilead Sciences Inc.  Q3 2020 Earnings 
28-Oct  Anthem Inc.  Q3 2020 Earnings 
28-Oct  Equinix Inc  Q3 2020 Earnings 
29-Oct  Apple Inc.  Q4 2020 Earnings 
29-Oct  Amazon  Q3 2020 Earnings 
29-Oct  Alphabet  Q3 2020 Earnings 
29-Oct  Facebook Inc.  Q3 2020 Earnings 
29-Oct  Samsung  Q3 2020 Earnings 
29-Oct  China Life Insurance Co Ltd (A)  Q3 2020 Earnings 
29-Oct  Comcast Corp. (Class A)  Q3 2020 Earnings 
29-Oct  Shopify Inc (A)  Q3 2020 Earnings 
29-Oct  Sanofi S.A.  Q3 2020 Earnings 
29-Oct  AB InBev SA-NV (Anheuser-Busch InBev)  Q3 2020 Earnings 
29-Oct  American Tower Corp.  Q3 2020 Earnings 
29-Oct  Starbucks Corp.  Q4 2020 Earnings 
29-Oct  Shell (Royal Dutch Shell)  Q3 2020 Earnings 
29-Oct  Volkswagen (VW) St.  Q3 2020 Earnings 
29-Oct  Stryker Corp.  Q3 2020 Earnings 
29-Oct  China Petroleum & Chemical (Sinopec) (A)  Q3 2020 Earnings 
29-Oct  China Life Insurance Co. Ltd.  Q3 2020 Earnings 
30-Oct  China Construction Bank Corp.  Q3 2020 Earnings 
30-Oct  AbbVie Inc  Q3 2020 Earnings 
30-Oct  ExxonMobil Corp. (Exxon Mobil)  Q3 2020 Earnings 
30-Oct  Chevron Corp.  Q3 2020 Earnings 
30-Oct  Honeywell  Q3 2020 Earnings 
30-Oct  PetroChina Co Ltd (A)  Q3 2020 Earnings 
30-Oct  Postal Savings Bank of China Registered Shs -A-  Q3 2020 Earnings 
30-Oct  TOTAL S.A.  Q3 2020 Earnings 
30-Oct  AUDI AG  Q3 2020 Earnings 
30-Oct  Altria Inc.  Q3 2020 Earnings 
30-Oct  Colgate-Palmolive Co.  Q3 2020 Earnings 
31-Oct  Berkshire Hathaway Inc.  Q3 2020 Earnings 
31-Oct  Industrial and Commercial Bank of China Ltd (A)  Q3 2020 Earnings 
31-Oct  Industrial & Commercial Bank of China Ltd.  Q3 2020 Earnings 
31-Oct  China Merchants Bank Co Ltd.  Q3 2020 Earnings 
31-Oct  Bank of China Ltd  Q3 2020 Earnings 

 

Trump suggests delaying US Presidential Election, US GDP better than expected

Equities
US Presidential Election

US President Donald Trump has tweeted that the US Presidential Election 2020 should be delayed beyond November. US stock market futures paid little attention to the comment, but the Dow was 300 points in the red anyway after US growth and jobs data. Trump claimed, without providing any evidence, that November’s ballot would be “the most inaccurate & fraudulent election in history”.

Can Trump delay the US 2020 Presidential Election?

The president has long taken issue with mail-in ballots, and has claimed before that they pose a high risk of fraud. Many states have already taken the decision to open mail-in ballots to all voters for safety reasons given the huge number of coronavirus cases in the United States.

As Helen Thomas pointed out in our earlier election coverage, “recent electoral results have indicated that expanding vote-by-mail favours Democrats, as the easy access to the ballot has increased turnout in their favour”.

US GDP better than forecast, but jobless claims rise

Markets were little cheered by the latest US economic data, despite a smaller than expected decline in Q2 GDP. The economy shrank by -32.9% between April and June, compared to forecasts of a -34.1% drop. The decline is still the largest drop in output since the Second World War.

Jobless claims figures published alongside the latest US growth data pointed to a small uptick in claims. 1.434 million Americans filed for jobless benefits in the week ending July 25th, up from 1.416 million the previous week. The four-week average has risen from 1.360 million to 1.368 million, and the number of continuing claims rose from 16.2 million to 17 million – a much larger increase than had been forecast.

Stocks edge further into negative territory

European stocks and US futures slowly drifted further into negative territory after the data, with Wall Street going on to open around -1% lower. Equities had been languishing in the red ever since this morning’s European data, which showed a larger-than-expected drop in Q2 GDP for Germany and a rise in Eurozone unemployment.

At the time of writing the DAX was down -4%, while the Euro Stoxx 50 was trending -3% lower.

Week Ahead: Massive week for earnings, Federal Reserve meeting on tap

Week Ahead

Coming up this week – will the Federal Reserve lean on bond yields, and can Amazon, Alphabet, Apple and Facebook meet lofty expectations for earnings? 

Earnings 

Investors are becoming increasingly concentrated in a handful of big names, especially the very popular tech sector. The concentration is so large that the biggest five stocks make up almost a quarter of the total market capitalisation of the S&P 500. These stocks have returned 35% YTD, while the remaining 495 stocks have declined –5%. With such a high concentration in big tech, earnings updates from four of the five this week are going to be critical for the market’s direction. 

Facebook (FB), Amazon.com (AMZN), Apple (AAPL), and Alphabet (GOOGL) are all due to report earnings this week. This will provide the market with an important steer on the resilience of earnings among the largest-cap stocks as well crucial guidance on the coming quarters.  Read our preview to the Amazon earnings.

In a very busy week for earnings, Royal Dutch Shell and AstraZeneca are the biggest UK stocks to report, whilst luxury comes in for scrutiny with results due from Hermes and LVMH. 

Federal Reserve meeting – leaning on the front end? 

Talk of yield curve control is keeping Treasury rates low and weighing on real rates, but it is unclear whether the Federal Reserve will seek to lean any more on the front end of the curve when it meets on Wednesday. Chair Jay Powell has stressed that the Fed isn’t even thinking about thinking of raising rates, whilst the decline in US real yields to record lows is a sign perhaps that the market believes the Fed may do more. 

No policy change is expected at this week’s meeting, but it the talks are likely to set the stage for a move in the autumn to inject further support after last month the Fed said that highly accommodative policy was likely to last many years. At the last FOMC meeting, it was agreed that officials need more analysis of yield curve control but there was agreement on the need for more explicit forward guidance on interest rates, perhaps tying it to concrete targets for inflation or employment levels. This could further anchor the front end of the yield curve, acting as a de facto control mechanism.  

GDP figures – how bad was it? 

After the Fed, Thursday sees the release of the advanced US GDP reading for Q2. The Atlanta Fed’s GDPNow model indicates the world’s largest economy shrank by around 35% in the second quarter. However, we already know that the June quarter was terrible – the backwards-looking data may prove less instructive than the now hot-ticket US weekly jobs report, also due on Thursday. Ahead of these and before the European session opens the latest German GDP numbers will be released. 

 

Highlights on XRay this Week  

Read the full schedule of financial market analysis and training. 

07.15 UTC  Daily  European Morning Call 
12.00 UTC  27-Jul  Master the Markets 
From 15.30 UTC  28-Jul  Weekly Gold, Silver, and Oil Forecasts 
17:00 UTC  30-Jul  Election2020 Weekly 
19.30 UTC  30-Jul  Daily FX recap 

  

Top Earnings Reports this Week 

Here are some of the biggest earnings reports scheduled for this week: 

27-Jul  SAP 
27-Jul  LVMH 
28-Jul  3M 
28-Jul  Starbucks 
28-Jul  McDonald’s 
28-Jul  Amgen 
28-Jul  Visa 
28-Jul  Pfizer 
29-Jul  PayPal 
29-Jul  Facebook 
29-Jul  Boeing 
30-Jul  Nestle 
30-Jul  Samsung 
30-Jul  Procter & Gamble 
30-Jul  Alphabet 
30-Jul  Amazon 
30-Jul  Apple 
30-Jul  Shell 
30-Jul  AstraZeneca 
30-Jul  Hermes 
31-Jul  Chevron 

  

Key Events this Week 

Watch out for the biggest events on the economic calendar this week: 

08.0UTC  27-Jul  German Ifo Business Climate 
12.30 UTC  27-Jul  US core durable goods orders 
07:0UTC  28-Jul  Spain unemployment rate 
14:00 UTC  28-Jul  US CB consumer confidence 
01.30 UTC  29-Jul  Australia CPI inflation 
14:0UTC  29-Jul  US pending home sales 
14.30 UTC  29-Jul  US EIA Crude Oil Inventories 
18.00 UTC  29-Jul  Federal Reserve statement + press conference 
06:00 UTC  30-Jul  German preliminary GDP 
12.30 UTC  30-Jul  US Weekly Jobless Claims 
12:30 UTC  30-Jul  US advanced Q2 GDP 
14.30 UTC  30-Jul  US EIA Natural Gas Storage 
01.00 UTC  31-Jul  China PMIs 
12:30 UTC  31-Jul  US core PCE inflation, spending 

 Find every event in our economic calendar.

Markets jump on Gilead news

Equities

European stocks added to gains and US futures extended higher after a report indicated positive results from Gilead’s drug trials for treating Covid-19.  

 

Gilead said it was aware of positive data emerging from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases’ (NIAID) study of its antiviral drug remdesivir for the treatment of Covid-19. Gilead will share additional data on its own trials in due course, stating in a PR: This study will provide information on whether a shorter, 5-day duration of therapy may have similar efficacy and safety as the 10-day treatment course evaluated in the NIAID trial and other ongoing trials. Gilead expects data at the end of May from the second SIMPLE study evaluating the 5- and 10-day dosing durations of remdesivir in patients with moderate COVID-19 disease.’

 

This is undoubtedly positive for risk – the closer you get to treatment or a vaccine the quicker we reopen the economy and the lower the risk of a 2nd, 3rd wave outbreaks. Rumours of positive results from Gilead a week ago helped lift spirits and this is yet more encouraging news. We are also hearing that there will be a press conference later today with Dr Fauci on the NIAID results, which may offer further details for markets. 

 

The FTSE 100 extended gains to take out 6060, whilst the DAX moved aggressively back to with touching distance of 11,000. The S&P 500 headed to open up at 2920, with the Dow seen up +400 points at the open around 24,540. 

 

Meanwhile, after some delay and an initial misprint we learned US GDP contracted 4.8% in the first quarter. The usual caveats pertain – it’s backward-looking data and the worst of the damage will be done in Q2, but nonetheless it was worse than the –4% expected. 

CySEC (EU)

  • Client’s funds are kept in segregated bank accounts
  • FSCS Investor Compensation up to EUR20,000
  • 1,000,000 insurance cover** 
  • Negative Balance Protection

Products

  • CFD
  • Share Dealing
  • Strategy Builder

Markets.com, operated by Safecap Investments Limited (“Safecap”) Regulated by CySEC under licence no. 092/08 and FSCA under licence no. 43906.

FSC (GLOBAL)

  • Clients’ funds kept in segregated bank accounts
  • Electronic Verification
  • Negative Balance Protection
  • $1,000,000 insurance cover** 

Products

  • CFD
  • Strategy Builder

Markets.com, operated by Finalto (BVI) Ltd by the BVI Financial Services Commission (‘FSC’) under licence no. SIBA/L/14/1067.

FCA (UK)

  • Client’s funds are kept in segregated bank accounts
  • FSCS Investor Compensation up to GBP85,000
    *depending on criteria and eligibility
  • £1,000,000 insurance cover** 
  • Negative Balance Protection

Products

  • CFD
  • Spread Bets
  • Strategy Builder

Markets.com operated by Finalto Trading Ltd. Regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (“FCA”) under licence number 607305.

ASIC (AU)

  • Clients’ funds kept in segregated bank accounts
  • Electronic Verification
  • Negative Balance Protection
  • $1,000,000 insurance cover**

Products

  • CFD

Markets.com, operated by Finalto (Australia) Pty Ltd Holds Australian Financial Services Licence no. 424008 and is regulated in the provision of financial services by the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (“ASIC”).

Selecting one of these regulators will display the corresponding information across the entire website. If you would like to display information for a different regulator, please select it. For more information click here.

**Terms & conditions apply. Click here to read full policy.

Marketsi
An individual approach to investing.

Whether you’re investing for the long-term, medium-term or even short-term, Marketsi puts you in control. You can take a traditional approach or be creative with our innovative Investment Strategy Builder tool, our industry-leading platform and personalised, VIP service will help you make the most of the global markets without the need for intermediaries.

La gestión de acciones del grupo Markets se ofrece en exclusiva a través de Safecap Investments Limited, regulada por la Comisión de Bolsa y Valores de Chipre (CySEC) con número de licencia 092/08. Le estamos redirigiendo al sitio web de Safecap.

Redirigir

Are you lost?

We’ve noticed you’re on the site. As you are connecting from a location in the you should therefore consider re-entering , which is subject to the product intervention measures. Whilst you’re free to browse here on your own exclusive initiative, viewing the site for your country will display the corresponding regulatory information and relevant protections of the company you choose. Would you like to be redirected to ?