Week Ahead: All eyes on Jackson Hole

Week Ahead

The Jackson Hole Symposium is the big one this week. 

This annual gathering of top US and international finance policymakers, movers, and shakers has long been used to break major policy shifts. Markets are anticipating Fed Chair Jerome Powell will be using this year’s meeting to announce QE and stimulus policy changes. 

Powell could use the Symposium to announce a pullback from its current bond-buying programme. The Fed hinted as much in its July meetings, and there’s been plenty of rumblings that tapering is on the way, but as yet traders and investors are yet to receive an official green light.  

At present, the Fed is currently buying $120bn in fixed-income assets every month. $80bn comes from Treasury securities and the remaining $40bn is sourced from mortgage-backed securities. All of this was part of a package of ideas to help support the COVID-ravaged US economy. 

Bond traders and currency markets in particular are watching Thursday’s get together with interest. Clarity on the economy’s course, and navigational ideas to make it through a Delta-dominated landscape, will do much to allay their fears. It’s up to Powell now. 

Since the start of the year, the economy has been accelerating rapidly – even if last quarter’s GDP growth failed to meet expectations. But rapid rises can bring other challenges. In this case, they’re inflation shaped. CPI and PPI keep growing at record rates too, and while Powell has been content to let the economy run hot, he’d best put on some oven gloves, lest his fingers get burned. 

Speaking of inflation, further data on its impact is on its way with Friday’s release of Personal Consumption Expenditure index numbers, the Fed’s preferred gauge of inflation. 

PCE growth clocked in at 0.4% in July, below the expected 0.6%, but an increase of 3.5% on an annualized basis. Seeing as it has been rapidly rising across the past couple of months, no doubt Powell and co. will be keeping a very close eye on Friday’s print. 

Further economic health indicators are on their way in the shape of a Monday morning PMI blitz. We’ll get releases judging American business output then, as well as IHS Markit insights into British and European activity too.  

US flash PMI readings for manufacturing and service productivity are released on Monday. There will be a lot to unpack when these are published, particularly as July’s numbers reported solid-but-slowing growth in American business activity. 

Both services and manufacturing sectors continue to feel the twin fangs of inflation and COVID-19. Factory output caused the manufacturing index to drop from June’s 63.7 reading to 59.7 in July (a four-month low), while the services sector also pulled back from 64.6 to 59.8.  

Higher input costs, staff shortages, and rising raw material costs are limiting growth. Let’s be clear: a reading over 50 indicates growth, but it does appear there’s a slowdown occurring in American productivity. 

Much the same can be said of the UK, according to its own PMI figures. August’s index readings are published on Monday morning, but we’ve seen supply chain bottlenecks and low worker numbers hold back output.  

July’s IHS Markit UK services PMI score was 59.6, a quite significant drop from June’s 62.4. Manufacturing showed a similar drop to 59.2 from 62.2.  

“More businesses are experiencing growth constraints from supply shortages of labour and materials, while on the demand side we’ve already seen the peak phase of pent-up consumer spending,” said IHS Markit’s economics director, Tim Moore. 

Conversely, EU productivity showed a July surge. IHS Markit’s final composite Purchasing Managers’ Index reached 60.2 in July – the highest level since June 2006 – indicating a strong showing from both services and manufacturing. 

However, to sustain this, the EU will have to be careful to avoid the logistical and labour market snags that have hit the UK and US. It’s unlikely to do so, so we could be looking at a lower reading in August. 

Major economic data 

Date  Time (GMT+1)   Asset  Event 
Mon 23-Aug  8.15am  EUR  French Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  8.15am  EUR  French Flash Services PMI 
  8.30am  EUR  German Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  8.30am  EUR  German Flash Services PMI 
  9.00am  EUR  Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  9.00am  EUR  Flash Services PMI 
  9.30am  GBP  Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  9.30am  GBP  Flash Services PMI 
  2.45pm  USD  Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  2.45pm  USD  Flash Services PMI 
       
Wed 24-Aug  3.30pm  OIL  US Crude Oil Inventories 
       
Thu 25-Aug  ALL DAY  USD  Jackson Hole Symposium 
  1.30pm  USD  Preliminary GDP q/q 
  1.30pm  USD  Unemployment Claims 
       
Fri 26-Aug  ALL DAY  USD  Jackson Hole Symposium 
  1.30pm  USD  Core PCE Price Index m/m 

 

Week Ahead: ECB to tilt after strategic shift?

Week Ahead

The ECB clarifies its policy position following June’s strategic shift this week. Data is dominated by UK monthly retail sales following a bumper second quarter, and a flurry of PMI reports. Meanwhile, Q2 earnings season heats up on Wall Street.

Let’s start with the major central bank announcement of the week. This time, it’s the turn of the European Central Bank. Markets will be watching the ECB’s next moves with additional scrutiny as it committed to a strategic refresh earlier last month.

We’ve seen inflation rates rise in the UK and US recently. While Eurozone inflation dipped away from a two-year high a couple of weeks ago, inflation and its effects have been brought to the fore of EU monetary policymakers’ thinking.

Following an 18-month strategic review, the EU has shifted its inflation target to 2%. According to observers, that would give the bloc enough wiggle room to a) accept temporary inflation rates above that and b) keep interest rates near or at historic lows.

Could this feed into a change in pandemic monetary policy? It’s possible, but the fact there is space for ECB policymakers to keep rates low suggests there’ll be no major change from the bloc’s current monetary trajectory.

At June’s meeting, the European Central Bank reiterated its commitment to €1.85 trillion in asset purchases under its PEPP mechanism. This was said to remain in place until March 2022.

Turning to data, one of the week’s key releases is UK retail sales for June and the month-to-month comparisons.

We can gauge June’s figures by looking at the recently-released Q2 2021 retail numbers reported by the British Retail Consortium alongside KPMG.

According to BRC, retail sales jumped 10.4% between April-June when weighted against the same period in 2019. This was the fastest quarterly growth reported since records began back in 1995.

The report also comes with an initial British retail health check for June too. KPMG reports that, against 2019’s levels, retail sales in June shot up 13.1%.

For context, BRC and KMPG are weighing retail sales against 2019’s numbers, as 2020’s numbers have been distorted by the Covid-19 pandemic.

A combination of lockdown easing, warmer summer temperatures, and Euro 2020 contributed to the rise in retail spending. Additionally, many UK holidaymakers have had no choice but to stay at home, thus keeping money that would be spent overseas in the local economy.

All of this is down to pent up demand being unleashed as lockdown restrictions lift. From Monday, nearly all of the major restrictions on British life are being removed, so the battle for wallets is now on.

What will be interesting to see is any change in habits from retail spending to experiences. This was the trend in the US for the past couple of months, so UK may shoppers may also move towards doing things rather than buying things.

We also have a wealth of PMI reports coming in from the US, UK, and the EU on Friday.

For the UK, both services and manufacturing IHS Markit PMIs showed the UK is still very much on a growth footing.

Starting with manufacturing, June’s reading came in at 63.9, a touch lower than May’s all-time high of 65.6, but still one of the highest rates in the survey’s 30-year history. However, industry insiders warned supply chain snarls and high input costs meeting surging demand could cause a slowdown in factory output going forward.

June’s services PMI reading was in line with UK manufacturing: a slight dip away from May’s high, but still showing strong growth. The actual reading came in at 62.4. However, rising operational expenses and staff shortages could impact growth in the short term, as could rising inflation. We’ll get a clearer picture with July’s reading.

The EU will be hoping to keep the momentum rolling into July too. June’s readings were some of the most positive for years. June’s composite flash index was 59.2 – an increase over the 57.1 registered in May. Services bounced from 55.2 to 58.0, suggesting pent up demand is driving the hospitality and services sector forward.

The US, while thriving, could have reached its peak, according to PMI releases. Its composite score for June was 63.7 – the second-fastest rate of expansion on record.

Chris Williamson, chief business economist at IHS Markit, said: “June saw another month of impressive output growth across the manufacturing and services sectors of the US economy, rounding off the strongest quarterly expansion since data were first available in 2009.”

“The rate of growth cooled compared to May’s record high, however, adding to signs that the economy’s recovery bounce peaked in the second quarter.”

Inflation will no doubt play a big role in July’s PMI calculations. Core and non-core prices are up in the economies mentioned above, but Friday’s release will give us a better understanding of its impact on US economic activity.

We also transition into the second week of US Q2 earning season. A mixture of tech and FMCG firms are reporting this week, including the likes of Netflix, Twitter, Intel, Johnson & Johnson, and Coca-Cola.

Oilfield services and engineering firm Schlumberger may be one to watch. Oil prices have gone from strength to strength this the tail end of last year. Has this fed into increased activity for multinationals like Schlumberger and consequently better financial results?

You can find a run down of the large caps reporting on Wall Street this week below, but you can also see our full US earnings calendar here.

Major economic data

Date Time (GMT+1) Asset Event
Tue 20-Jul 2.30am AUD Monetary Policy Meeting Minutes
 
Wed 21-Jul 2.30am AUD Retail Sales m/m
  3.30pm OIL US Crude Oil Inventories
 
Thu 22-Jul 12.45pm EUR Monetary Policy Statement
  12.45pm EUR Main Refinancing Rate
  1.30pm EUR ECB Press Conference
  3.30pm GAS US Natural Gas Inventories
 
Fri 23-Jul 7.00am GBP Retail Sales m/m
  8.15am EUR French Flash Manufacturing PMI
  8.15am EUR French Flash Services PMI
  8.30am EUR German Flash Manufacturing PMI
  8.30am EUR German Flash Services PMI
  9.00am EUR Flash Manufacturing PMI
  9.00am EUR Flash Services PMI
  9.30am GBP Flash Manufacturing PMI
  9.30am GBP Flash Services PMI
  1.30pm CAD Core Retail Sales m/m
  1.30pm CAD Retail Sales m/m
  2.45pm USD Flash Manufacturing PMI
  2.45pm USD Flash Services PMI

 

Key earnings data

Mon 19-Jul Tue 20-Jul Wed 21-Jul Thu 22-Jul Fri 23-Jul
Philip Morris International Coca-Cola AT&T American Express
IBM
Netflix Johnson & Johnson Newmont Goldcorp Schlumberger
Verizon Communications Intel Corp
Snap Inc
Twitter Inc

Week Ahead: Bank of England to follow Fed with hawkish tilt?

Week Ahead

The Bank of England gives us a fresh monetary policy update this week as inflation pressure starts to build. Will the first readings give the bank jitters or is it made of sterner stuff? Elsewhere, PMI data comes from the US, UK and EU, following on from a bumper may. OPEC and allies are busy too with another range of policy-deciding meetings kicking off. 

Andrew Bailey and the Bank of England are next week’s headline act. The UK’s central bank delivers its latest monetary policy decision and is expected to stand pat, though it comes against a backdrop of fast economic growth and rising inflation. 

A change in thinking could be underway. Governor Bailey has repeatedly stated in the past that if prices consistently outstrip the BoE’s 2% inflation target, he’ll have no problems tightening up policy. In this instance, that could mean a rate hike. 

The BoE’s base rate has remained at 0.1% for the past year as part of the range of emergency pandemic economic measures enacted by the bank.   

Consumer price inflation rose 2.1% on an annualised basis in May, according to Office of National Statistics figures released last week. Month-to-month inflation clocked in at 0.6%.  

There is no indication, however, that a rate change will happen immediately. While there is more at play here, a lot of inflationary pressure stems from the reopening of the UK economy, and base effects from 2020. But consistency will be key. If we see more inflation increases month to month, the BoE may be forced to react 

Turning to data, purchasing manager index readings from the US, UK and EU are released this week. All these major economies will be looking to build on May’s impressive momentum.   

For instance, IHS Markit’s US manufacturing PMI hit its highest levels since October 2009 in May, with a reading of 61.5. Domestic demand and consumption spurred on US manufacturing last month, but producers are still warning of supply chain issues, including raw material and labour shortages. A lower reading in June may be realistic.  

US services’ expansion outstripped manufacturing. May’s PMI read 70.1, jumping away above April’s 64.7. Higher consumer confidence paired with the US’ impressive vaccine rollout explains the high level of new service sector business. 

Likewise, the UK experienced an eye-popping level of services output growth in May as lockdown restrictions loosen. The sector’s PMI reached 62.9 – the highest level since May 1997. Manufacturing surged, driven by a deluge of new orders, reached 65.6 last month, a 29-year high. 

May was also a good month for Eurozone business activity. IHS Markit’s composite EU PMI reached a three-year high, with a score of 57.1, comfortably above April’s 53.8. Remember, growth is indicated by a reading of 50 or higher, so while the pace wasn’t as fast as in the UK or US, the EU showed good signs of economic resilience last month. Can it do the same again in June? 

Sticking with data, the final reading of US Q1 GDP growth is also due this week. The final reading acts as a sort of confirmation, a check of economic health in broad terms. May’s earlier advanced figure was 6.4%, showing signs of an economy poised to boom. PMI flashpoints back this up. Double digit GDP growth could be on the way in Q2 too. 

Away from raw economic data, OPEC and allies gather on Thursday for another series of meetings. Rising oil prices will no doubt put the cartel in a good mood, but it needs to proceed with caution here. Any unexpected spikes in production output, as opposed to OPEC+’s current steady tapering programme, could result in oversupply, despite confident global demand recovery forecasts. 

OPEC+ decided in April to return 2.1 million barrels per day (bpd) of supply to the market between May and July. We could see a wider plan come together this week for post-July tapering. 

The cartel is sticking with its optimistic oil demand outlook. Its June monthly report states demand would rise by 6.6% to hit 5.95 million bpd in 2021. The forecast was unchanged for a second consecutive month. 

How OPEC and allies proceed is critical here. With WTI and Brent reaching over $72 and $74 at the time of writing, some of the highest prices for years, the signs of intensified global oil demand are there – but any oversupply may tip the scales back to retraction instead of price growth.  

Major economic data 

Date  Time (GMT+1)  Asset  Event 
Mon 21-Jun  2.30am  AUD  Retail sales m/m 
       
Wed 23-Jun  8.15 am  EUR  French Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  8.15 am  EUR  French Flash Services PMI 
  8.30 am  EUR  German Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  8.30 am  EUR  German Flash Services PMI 
  9.00 am  EUR  Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  9.00 am  EUR  Flash Services PMI 
  9.30 am  GBP  Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  9.30 am  GBP  Flash Services PMI 
  1.30 pm  CAD  Core Retail Sales m/m 
  1.30 pm  CAD  Retail Sales m/m 
  2.45 pm  USD  Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  2.45 pm  USD  Flash Services PMI 
  3.30pm  OIL  US Crude Oil Inventories 
       
Thu 24-Jun  All Day  OIL  OPEC+ Meetings 
  12.00 pm  GBP  MPC Official Bank Rate Vote 
  12.00 pm  GBP  Monetary Policy Statement 
  12.00 pm  GBP  MPC Asset Purchase Facility Votes 
  12.00 pm  GBP  Official Bank Rate 
  1.30pm  USD  Final GDP q/q 
  3.30pm  GAS  US Natural Gas Inventories 

 

Key earnings data 

Date  Company  Event 
Mon 21-Jun  Naspers  Q4 2021 Earnings 
     
Wed 23-Jun  Markit  Q2 2021 Earnings 
     
Thu 24-Jun  Nike Inc.  Q4 2021 Earnings 
  Accenture plc  Q3 2021 Earnings 
  FedEx Corp.  Q4 2021 Earnings 

Week Ahead: FOMC minutes, global PMI rush & UK CPI/Retail sales

Week Ahead

FOMC meeting minutes are released this week for April’s meeting as pressure mounts on Jerome Powell et al to take inflation seriously.

UK CPI data gives an insight into inflation there, while the first batch of post-lockdown retail sales data lets us see if shoppers are heading back to the British high street.

There’s a wealth of PMI data coming from the UK, US, and EU too. How will their economic recoveries compare?

FOMC meeting minutes – is the time act approaching?

We get a detailed look inside the FOMC this week as it releases its minutes for its April meeting.

We know the story now. Despite acknowledging the fact inflation is probably on its way, although rising fuel-led CPI data has shown this is already case, no major tweaks are coming to the Fed’s current policy.

Chairman Jerome Powell is content with letting the economy run hot. Rates remain at near zero. QE will remain in place for the foreseeable at $120bn a month in treasury and agency mortgage-backed securities.

We’ve spoken in the past about what it will take for Powell and Co. to switch things up. According to Powell, three criteria need to be met:

• Effective complete recovery in the labour market
• Inflation reaching 2%
• Inflation running above 2% for a sustainable period of time

Employment might be key here. Eight million Americans are still out of work – although job openings have leapt above that figure. April’s NFP data was not quite as stellar as March’s blockbuster performance either.

The US economy is strengthening. First quarter GDP grew 6.4% year-on-year. We’re not out of the woods yet though, but the momentum is building – maybe it’ll force Powell’s hand in June. For now, the course is steady.

UK CPI shines inflation spotlight on UK economy

We’ll get a taste of the state of inflation in the UK this week with April’s year-on-year CPI data release.

According to May’s Monetary Policy Report, the Bank of England puts current CPI below the Monetary Policy Committee’s (MPC) target of 2.0%. However, we’ve seen indicators that inflation is coming in previous Office of National Statistics (CPI) releases.

March’s ONS CPI reading put the consumer price inflation at 0.7%, compared with 0.4% in February, and rebalancing with the 0.7% level seen in January.

Looking across the year, BoE forecasts think its 2.0% target might be hit by the end of the year. Other commentators have similar outlooks, maybe not hitting the full 2.0% level, but close to it. For instance, National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) puts year-end CPI at 1.8%, rising to 2.0% by Q2 2022.

Pantheon’s Chief UK Economist Samuel Tombs believes the 2.0% figure will come this month, with April’s printing clocking in at 1.7%. Tombs thinks, because the reading will come after shops have opened, alongside an anticipated semi-annual increase in electricity and natural gas prices, we’ll get a more accurate reading of the state of things.

First post-lockdown UK retail sales data inbound

UK retail sales data for April is coming, following preliminary data published last week.

As to be expected, with lockdown relaxing and non-essential shops open for trading again, initial sales data shows an encouraging spike across April. BRC-KPMG Retail Sales Monitor, overall retail sales in April rose 7.3% against April 2019 (when figures were unaffected by the Covid-19 pandemic).

On a like-for-like basis, sales were up 46%.

“Following the reopening of so-called non-essential stores on 12th April in England and Wales and continued online growth, retail sales enjoyed a welcome boost last month. With the short-term pent-up demand for the shopping experience drawing consumers back to stores, non-food sales across stores and online increased by a quarter between March and April,” BRC Chief Executive Helen Dickinson said.

“Many fashion retailers saw an uptick in sales, particularly in outerwear and knitwear, as the public braved the cold spring weather for outdoor meeting and dining with friends. Furniture also saw a boost as consumers can once again try before they buy,” Dickinson added.

In the three weeks following the first reopening of stores across England and Wales, overall non-food sales in the UK rose 25% against spending levels of seen in March when the lockdown was still in full effect.

Inevitably, the growth rate will slow once the retail segment fully normalises. In the short term though, the sector looks like it’s being buoyed by an expected post-lockdown surge.

Worldwide PMI rush

An avalanche of flash PMI readings are on their way. The EU reports this week, as does the UK and US.

Starting with the EU, the bloc will be hoping to build on April’s forward momentum. Services flash PMI that month hit a nine-month high, with a score of 53.7. Manufacturing was rated at 62.9 according to IHS Markit ratings.

The EU, then, may mirror the course the UK is on: GDP contraction in the first quarter, followed by growth across the year.

Looking to the UK, April saw a record increase in services PMI, reaching its highest level for seven years. March’s reading was 56.3. April’s was 61.0. The partial reopening of the hospitality sector has put it on a growth footing once more, and we may see further growth when venues allow indoor service from Monday.
IHS Markit’s April manufacturing PMI for the UK also showed very strong performance, after nudging record highs. The index rose to 60.9 over 58.9 for March. Growth is back in the sector as orders pick up, but IHS did flag supply chain delays and input issues that could affect ongoing performance.

While the EU and UK look to grow, US manufacturing might be taking a step back. April’s ISM manufacturing PMI data came in at 60.7 – far lower than the expected 65. Supply chain woes are holding the sector back, according to ISM.

We’ll get further information on the economic health of these key industries with the week’s PMI releases.

Major economic data

Date Time (GMT+1) Currency Event
Tue 18-May 2.30am AUD Monetary Policy Meeting Minutes
 
Wed 19-May 7.00am GBP CPI y/y
  1.30pm CAD CPI m/m
  3.30pm USD US Crude Oil Inventories
  7.00pm USD FOMC Meeting Minutes
 
Thu 20-May 2.30am AUD Employment Change
  2.30am AUD Unemployment Rate
  1.30pm USD Phily Fed Manufacturing Index
  1.30pm USD Unemployment Claims
  3.30pm USD US Natural Gas Inventories
 
Fri 21-May 2.30am AUD Retail Sales m/m
  3.00am NZD Annual Budget Release
  7.00am GBP Retail Sales m/m
  8.15am EUR French Flash Manufacturing PMI
  8.15am EUR French Flash Services PMI
  8.30am EUR German Flash Manufacturing PMI
  8.30am EUR German Flash Services PMI
  9.00am EUR Flash Manufacturing PMI
  9.00am EUR Flash Services PMI
  9.30am GBP Flash Manufacturing PMI
  9.30am GBP Flash Services PMI
  1.30pm CAD Core Retail Sales m/m
  1.30pm CAD Retail Sales m/m
  2.45pm USD Flash Manufacturing PMI

 

Key earnings data

Date Company Event
Mon 17-May Bridgestone Q1 2021 Earnings
  Ryanair Q4 2021 Earnings
 
Tue 18-May Walmart Q2 2022 Earnings
  Home Depot Q1 2021 Earnings
  Vodafone Q4 2021 Earnings
  LG Corp Q1 2021 Earnings
  Take Two Q4 2021 Earnings
  Tata Motors Q4 2021 Earnings
 
Wed 19-May Cisco Q3 2021 Earnings
  Lowe’s Q1 2021 Earnings
  JD.com Q1 2021 Earnings
  Target Q1 2021 Earnings
  Analog Devices Q2 2021 Earnings
  Experian Q4 2021 Earnings
 
Thu 20-May Tencent Holdings Q1 2021 Earnings
  Applied Materials Q2 2021 Earnings
  National Grid PLC Q4 2021 Earnings
  Palo Alto Networks Q3 2021 Earnings
  Ralph Lauren Q4 2021 Earnings
 
Fri 21-May Deere & Co. Q2 2021 Earnings

 

Week Ahead: Apple and Tesla earnings, Fed meeting and US GDP in focus

Week Ahead

Lots to bite our teeth into this week. We start with the Fed, although we’re not anticipating big things. An optimistic GDP outlook is coming for the US, though, while consumer confidence indicators are on their way.

Elsewhere, China’s manufacturing PMI data is released after 13 months of straight growth.

We’re also looking at another earnings charge as Wall Street reporting season rolls on with Apple, Facebook, Tesla, Alphabet and Microsoft all due to deliver quarterly numbers.

Fed meeting: no major changes ahead

America is gradually getting back to normality. The vaccine roll-out is picking up, people are returning to work and leisure, lockdown restrictions are easing and the economy is surging.

“You can see the economy opening, you can see the riderships [sic] on airplanes going up and people going back to restaurants,” Fed Chair Jerome Powell said in a recent Economic Club interview. “I think we’re going into a period of faster growth and higher job creation and that’s a good thing.”

So, what does this mean for the week’s Fed rate decision? The FOMC meets this week amidst speculation that the current “easy money” strategy may not be the right one.

With three stimulus deals pumping more liquidity into the economy, and historically low rates, ominous inflation war drums are sounding for some. However, we’re not likely to see any wholesale changes this week, with no change expected to rates until at least 2023 and bond purchases continuing at the current pace at least until later this year.

Powell has laid out the criteria for a major policy shift:

  • Effective complete recovery in the labour market
  • Inflation reaching 2%
  • Inflation running above 2% for a sustainable period of time

None of those boxes have been ticked thus far. Even so, jobs numbers are improving. The unemployment rate nudged down to 6% with last nonfarm payrolls. The extra liquidity afforded by Biden’s stimulus deals may also pump up consumer good prices too. Conditions for a rate change are swirling around.

But don’t go into the FOMC press conference expecting a blitz of new policy changes. The course is a steady one from here on out.

US quarterly GDP set to soar as economy roars

With the US economy roaring back to life, US GDP forecasts for the first quarter are electric.

Q4 2020 saw GDP growth revised upward from 4.1% to 4.3% as US consumers splash their stimulus cash. Consumer spending has been the key driver, but other areas of business investment are helping an economic surge. Exports rose 22.3%. Business investment in intellectual property, inventories and residential housing was up too.

All very good – but the real surge could be about to begin. Estimates for Q1 2021 GDP are exceptionally high.

The Atlanta Fed forecasts a whopping 8.3% at its latest GDP estimates dated April 16th. The key driver here is personal income. In January, household wealth increased by $2 trillion, alongside a 2.4% rise in spending. Combined with the other factors at play, like higher nonfarm payrolls, consumer spending, and industrial output, the recipe for high GDP growth is all there.

Extra household stimulus cheques are on their way. As vaccine rollout progresses, and further sectors are opened to individual spending, it’s likely GPD growth will surge. The challenge, then, is sustaining it.

Can US consumer confidence stay high?

It seems highly likely: consumer confidence hit a one-year high in March and things have only improved since then regards vaccines, reopening and stimulus. Given the way the vaccine rollout and economy are performing, this will probably be the case in April too.

Let’s look at March’s data to gauge April sentiment. Last month, consumers were upbeat about the jobs market. They were feeling cheery as restrictions on small-businesses are lifted. The thought of extra free cash from stimulus cheques is lifting the mood.

Big ticket items like cars, houses and household appliances are on US consumers’ shopping lists going forward as a savings glut plus extra government money is increasing spending power.

In point terms, the Confidence Board’s survey jumped 19.3 points to hit 109.7 in March. That’s the highest it has been for a year, and the highest points leap since April 2004.

March’s mood was good. Will we see the same in April?

China manufacturing PMI: can the sector bounce back?

China’s manufacturing PMI data is released this week as the nation’s economic recovery gains traction.

March’s index showed an increase over February’s numbers, rising from 50.6 to 51.9. While growth is still historically low for Chinese manufacturing, a reading over 50 implies the sector is still expanding. In fact, PMIs have shown growth readings for 13 straight months.

Production capacity was closed during Lunar Festival but it’s been back online. This is partly responsible for the PMI rise, but there are more important factors at play. Namely, the global economic recovery.

Orders are up, which means Chinese plants are busier. The US stimulus cheques are feeding into higher demand for consumer goods – great news for Chinese factory owners. Additionally, domestic and international orders of machinery like excavators are helping prop up sectoral growth.

Future prospects are buoyed by big spending plans overseas. Joe Biden’s mammoth infrastructure plan, if it passes, is being hungrily eyed by Chinese construction machinery and materials manufacturers. There’s profit to be had stateside.

China is on course for a bumper first quarter according to China’s National Bureau of Statistics. GDP growth has clocked in at a record 18.3%, following an economic surge that completely outpaces the US stellar growth.

While the short term outlook is encouraging, questions around sustainability remain. Exports, fuel for China’s manufacturing fire, were up 38.7% overall in Q1 2021, but those eye-watering numbers have been tempered by somewhat by the drop in export activity between February and March. A cause for concern to be sure, so this week’s PMI release will be interesting to watch.

Tech-heavy week ahead for earnings season

Wall Street prepares for another earnings barrage this week. As ever in earnings season, the reports are coming thick and fast.

There’s a bit of a tech focus to earnings this week. Apple, Amazon, Facebook, and Tesla are all reporting in. Tesla will be interesting, purely to see the impact its decision to spend billions on bitcoin has had on its financials. Previous reports suggest it has made more profit from the crypto this year then selling cars.

Apple’s financials come after the company’s 2021 launch event. A shiny new colour the iPhone twelve, plus a rainbow of hues for iMacs, Apple TV updates, and more have all been launched – but the focus is very much on iPhone 12 sales. With six out of every ten smartphones sold in Q1 being an iPhone, Apple could be looking at another record breaking quarter.

We also see oil majors ExxonMobil, BP, Shell, TOTAL, and Chevron share earnings, which probably won’t be as colossal as Apple’s. ExxonMobil says resurgent oil prices means figures may be better than expected but could be facing a chilling $800m loss thanks to the Texas Big Freeze. Will we see more hefty losses for the majors?

See below for a roundup of this week’s reporting large caps.

Major economic data

Date  Time (GMT+1)  Currency  Event 
Mon 26-Apr  9.00am  EUR  German IFO Business Climate 
       
Tue 27-Apr  Tentative  JPY  BOJ Outlook Report 
  Tentative  JPY  Monetary Policy Statement 
  Tentative  JPY  BOJ Press Conference 
  3.00pm  USD  CB Consumer Confidence 
       
Wed 28-Apr  All day  All  OPEC-JMMC Meeting 
  2.30am  AUD  CPI q/q 
  2.30am  AUD   Trimmed Mean CPI q/q 
  1.30pm  CAD  Core Retail Sales m/m 
  1.30pm  CAD  Retail Sales m/m 
  3.30pm  USD  US Crude Oil Inventories 
  7.00pm  USD  FOMC Statement 
  7.00pm  USD  Federal Funds Rate 
  7.30pm  USD  FOMC Press Conference 
       
Thu 29-Apr  2.00am  NZD  Final ANZ Business Confidence 
  1.30pm  USD  Advance GDP q/q 
  1.30pm  USD  Advance GPD Index q/q 
  1.30pm  USD  Unemployment claims 
  3.00pm  USD   Pending House Sales 
       
Fri 30-Apr  2.00am  CNY  Manufacturing PMI 
  9.00am  EUR  Germany Prelim GDP q/q 
  1.30pm  CAD  GDP m/m 

 

Key earnings data

Date  Company  Event 
Mon 26-Apr  Tesla  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Vale  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Canadian National Railway Co.  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Philips  Q1 2021 Earnings 
     
Tue 27-Apr  Microsoft  Q3 2021 Earnings 
  Alphabet (Google)  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Visa  Q2 2021 Earnings 
  Novartis  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Texas Instruments  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Starbucks  Q2 2021 Earnings 
  HSBC  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  GE  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  3M  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  AMD  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  BP  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Mondalez  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Chubb  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Capital One  Q1 2021 Earnings 
     
     
Wed 28-Apr  Facebook  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Apple  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  QUALCOMM  Q2 2021 Earnings 
  Boeing  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Moody’s  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  NOVATEK  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Spotify  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Ford Motor Corp  Q1 2021 Earnings 
     
Thu 29-Apr  Amazon  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Samsung  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  MasterCard  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  China Construction Bank  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  McDonald’s  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Royal Dutch Shell  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Bank of China  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Sony  Q4 2020 Earnings 
  Caterpillar  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  TOTAL  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Airbus  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  S&P Global  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Gilead  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Sinopec  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  BASF  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Baidu  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Equinor  Q1 2021 Earnings 
     
Fri 30-Apr  Alibaba  Q4 2020 Earnings 
  ExxonMobil  Q1 2020 Earnings 
  AstraZeneca  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  BNP Paribas  Q1 2021 Earnings 
  Colgate-Palmolive  Q1 2021 Earnings 

Stocks start April on front foot, Roo licks its wounds, European manufacturing picking up?

Morning Note

In Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Joe Biden announced another massive ‘once-in-a-generation’ economic spending package barely weeks after a $1.9tn Covid relief bill. His $2tn+ infrastructure plan envisages a big, bold splurge on improving multiple areas of the economy. It’s another c10% of GDP, on top of the 10% added by his Covid bill and about the same added last year. This time, the package will be funded by tax rises, however these will be phased in over 15 years and it’s hard to see how the spending will not add to the deficit. The plans are already facing criticism on multiple fronts (too much, too little, don’t raise taxes, raise them even more!).

European markets trade broadly higher on the first trading day of the quarter after solid opening three months to 2021. The FTSE 100 moved a little higher this morning but remains well within its range for the year, and it 4% higher in 2021. The DAX trades above 15k and is +7% for the year – most of its exposure is to outside Germany, so it’s benefiting from the recovery in Asia and US. Yesterday the S&P rallied 0.9% for a fresh intra-day high just 5 points below 4,000, before closing up 0.4% to finish the quarter 5.8% ahead. The Dow was weaker on the day but nevertheless rose 7.8% for the quarter. For both, their performance in March was the best monthly gain since November.

Global manufacturing activity is starting to look good. Italy’s factory activity has grown at the fastest pace in over 20 years, according to this morning PMI. France’s March PMI showed the sharpest rise in manufacturing output since September 2000, albeit before the nation’s third lockdown was announced. The report also notes that the headline figure was inflated by a sharp downturn in vendor performance, which in normal times is a sign of health but these are not normal times and is more about supply chain problems and raw material shortages. Inflationary pressures were also evident as the scarcity of raw materials forced up cost burdens at the fastest rate since May 2011. The rate of inflation for prices charged to consumers was the strongest since June 2011. The Chicago PMI yesterday hit the best in two and a half years. The Bank of Japan’s headline Tankan index for big manufacturers’ sentiment improved to +5 in March from -10 in December. China’s manufacturing recovery continues, albeit at a slower pace last month.

Deliveroo shares are lower again after an ignominious crash on day one, sliding over 1% in early trade to 283p. ROO ended its first day of trading at 287p, down 26% from its list price. Several reasons are behind the poor performance. In addition to the failure to bring several large funds on board, the dual class share structure, regulatory uncertainty, general profitability concerns and a miscalculation by the bankers on the pricing in relation to wider demand in the market, it also looks like some hedge funds shorted the stock aggressively from day one. Not all stocks have a happy start to life on the stock market – just ask Tim Steiner or Mark Zuckerberg – but it’s not a great advert for London as a destination for tech listings.

Next shares are higher after it raised its full year profit outlook by £30m to £700m. Whilst the end of lockdown is two weeks later than expected, management said the profit lost from those additional two weeks has been offset by the benefit of the extension of business rates relief announced in March. In the first eight weeks of the year, online sales were stronger than expected, rising more than +60% on two years ago.

Bitcoin trades a little under $59k following news that Goldman Sachs is set to offer crypto services. Yesterday the bank said it is looking to offer a “full spectrum” of investments in Bitcoin and other digital assets, “whether that’s through the physical Bitcoin, derivatives or traditional investment vehicles”.

Gold popped up off the support at the $1,685 area to trade around the $1,715 marker. WTI has tested the $59 support ahead of the OPEC+ meeting, at which members are expected to maintain the current level of output curbs and Saudi Arabia will stick to its additional 1m bpd cut. The usual sources are already hitting the wires with ministers said to be discussing a range of options that include a rollover of cuts and a gradually increase in output at a maximum of 500k bpd, presumably on a monthly basis. US crude inventories unexpectedly fell as refiners ramped up activity to meet demand – gasoline demand is above where it was last year.

Week Ahead: NFPs, OPEC & PMIs

Week Ahead

OPEC+ meets this week against a backdrop of weaker oil prices. Nonfarm payroll data is released too. Will we see another strong month or is February’s surge a one-off? Meanwhile, the US and China square off in the manufacturing sphere with key PMI releases. Deliveroo, one of the UK’s most hotly anticipated IPOs, goes live too. 

OPEC+ meeting – more cuts or staying the course? 

Supporting oil prices throughout the lockdown and return normalcy has always been top of OPEC’s agenda. This will take on renewed importance in April’s meeting, as crude oil prices have dropped down from their $70 high over the past couple of weeks. 

At the time of writing, prices had risen off a six-week low despite the EIA reporting higher than expected storage volumes at US warehouses. WTI is trading about $60 with Brent at $63. 

Cuts are very likely to stay in place. OPEC and allies have taken 7% of pre-pandemic supply out of circulation, and chair Saudi Arabia has committed to a further 1m bpd cut. 

However, there is an EU-shaped spanner in the works.  

Vaccine rollout, or lack thereof, in Europe has also put pressure on oil prices. Politically motivated supply tussles, and now more questions around the AstraZeneca vaccine’s effectiveness, have all conspired to impact oil demand as speculators unwound long positions they had booked on higher summer travel demand. 

Vaccine uptake coupled with a fresh wave of new Covid-19 cases across Europe has resulted in tighter lockdowns. France and Germany, for example, have announced more restrictions, as has Poland. The UK has also said it has had to slow is own vaccine programme, one of the best in the world, due to vaccine supply pressure. 

For the second quarter of 2021, the EIA sees Brent prices averaging $64 per barrel and then averaging $58 a barrel in the second half of 2021, as it expects downward price pressures will emerge in the coming months as the oil market becomes more balanced.  

OPEC’s next move will be crucial if it wants to help support its members through better prices in 2021. 

US nonfarm payrolls – all eyes on labour market after February surge 

US nonfarm payrolls are released on Friday. Following February’s blowout month, the market will be watching March’s report intensely, hoping to pick up more signals that the US is quickly returning to economic health. 

 Payrolls surged 379,000 in February, smashing expectations of 210,000 and edging down the unemployment rate to 6.2%.  

The battered leisure and hospitality sector showed the lion’s share of new payrolls, with 355,000 added in February. While this encompasses cinemas, hotels, museums, resorts and amusement parts, it was food service that propped up the leisure and hospitality industry in terms of new jobs added, with 285,900. 

 Biden’s stimulus deal is likely supportive of new job creation. As part of the President’s $1.9 trillion  package, small businesses are receiving further support in order to a) support existing jobs and b) possibly lead to new hires or rehires. This includes: $25bn for restaurants and bars; $15bn for airlines and another $8bn for airports; $30bn for transit; $1.5bn for Amtrak and $3bn for aerospace manufacturing. 

Because of the stimulus package, other companies have halted lay off programmes. United Airlines, for instance, had scheduled 14,000 layoffs in February. According to a Washington Times report, this has been cancelled with extra government money flooding into United’s coffers. 

Local transport authorities, especially the Metropolitan Transportation Authority of New York, will be receiving billions, allowing them to protect jobs. New York will be receiving $6bn, for example, so it can stop layoffs and service cuts. 

Of course, this is mostly about protecting existing jobs. It will be interesting to see what effect that has on nonfarm payrolls for March. If SMEs are anticipating more government funds, that may then feed into increased payroll numbers, as their finances may allow recruitment to kick off again. 

US & China Manufacturing PMI 

The two global economic titans reveal their latest manufacturing PMI data in the week ahead. 

Starting with the US, we’ve already seen IHS Markit’s US manufacturing PMI for March, showing another strong month for the country’s factory output. This edged higher to 59 in March from 58.6 in February, implying  activity in the manufacturing sector continued to expand at a robust pace. This reading came in slightly lower than the market expectation of 59.3, but nothing to really fret about. 

We’re waiting for the Institute of Supply Management (ISM) PMI data in the week ahead. February’s was a blockbuster month for manufacturing, according to ISM, with the PMI reaching a three-year high of 60.8. If we take the IHS data as an indicator, then we’ll probably be looking at steady expansion, rather than another massive surge has seen in February. Still, encouraging signals for factory production levels throughout the US. 

The US’ economy has been in a healthier state since the new year. Stimulus put more money into consumers’ pockets, and we already know more is coming. Being able to pump that liquidity back into the economy may be why manufacturing is in such a good place. Vaccine rollout isn’t bad in the US either, which is also underpinning renewed confidence throughout the country. 

On the other hand, Chinese output slowed in February, according to the March release of the Caixin PMI, the country’s key factory productivity tracker. Could we see the slowdown continue in April? 

According to the last Caixin PMI, the index fell from January’s 51.5 reading to 50.9 in February – the lowest for 9 months. A reading above 50 still indicates growth, but the fact its dropping suggests a retraction. 

Why so? Domestic Covid-19 flair ups and slowing global demand for imported Chinese goods put a strain on China’s manufacturing centre. Factories also laid off workers and were in no hurry to fill their vacancies.  

Analysts still expect a strong year for China, as it was one of the few countries to show any real economic growth during 2020 at the height of the pandemic. However, February’s manufacturing slowdown highlights some fragility in the ongoing Chinese economic recovery. We’ll get a clearer picture when March’s PMI is released. 

Deliveroo IPO – save the date 

Deliveroo launches its IPO on March 31st, although unrestricted trading will not be available until April 7th 

Deliveroo has set a price range for its shares of between £3.90 and £4.60 per share, implying an estimated market capitalisation of between £7.6 billion and £8.8 billion.  

The company will issue 384,615,384 shares (excluding any over-allotment shares) and expects to raise £1bn from its IPO. Even at the lowest end of the range, it would be the largest listing in London for a decade and Europe’s largest this year.  

Amazon has a 15.8% stake in the company, but it plans to sell 23,302,240 shares for between £90.8 million and £107.2 million, depending on where the IPO prices. Chief executive and founder Will Shu will sell 6.7m shares, leaving him a remaining stake of 6.2% of the company, worth around £500m. 

Major economic data 

Date  Time (GMT)  Currency  Event 
Tue 30 Mar  3.00pm  USD  CB Consumer Confidence 
       
Wed 31 Mar  2.00am  CNH  Manufacturing PMI 
  1.15pm  USD  ADP Nonfarm Employment Change 
  1.30pm  CAD  GDP m/m 
  3.30pm  USD  US Crude Oil Inventories 
       
Thu 1 Apr  All Day  All  OPEC+ Meetings 
  3.00pm  USD  ISM Manufacturing PMI 
  3.30pm  USD  US Natural Gas Inventories 
       
Fri 2 Apr  1.30pm  USD  Average Hourly Earnings m/m 
  1.30pm  USD  Nonfarm Employment Change 
  1.30pm  USD  Unemployment Rate 

 

Key earnings data 

Date  Company  Event 
Mon 29 Mar  Sinopec  Q4 2020 Earnings 
     
Tue 30 Mar  Bank of China  Q4 2020 Earnings 
  Carnival  Q1 2021 Earnings 
     
Wed 31 Mar  Micron  Q2 2021 Earnings 
  Walgreens  Q2 2021 Earnings 

Week Ahead: Acronyms a-go-go – CPI, PMI & GDP releases

Week Ahead

A lot of economic data is released in key economies this week. Starting with the UK, CPI and retail sales figures are released, with furlough and lockdown still looming large over the economy. US GDP numbers for the first quarter are finalised but the focus will be on business sentiment showing up in a fresh batch of PMI releases from the US, UK and Eurozone amid vaccine progress that is diverging in the major economies.  

UK CPI 

Investors and FX traders will be watching UK inflation figures this week following the Bank of England decision. 

Inflation is in focus in the UK right now, as the effects of rising bond yields, further government economic support via Chancellor Sunak’s “spend now, tax later” budget, and the Bank of England’s response continue to colour the economic picture. 

ONS data shows the latest full-year CPI at 0.9%. Across 2021, the CPI is expected to rise to 1.5% across the year. Some estimates suggest it may even rise to 1.8% by April. 

 CPI inflation for the UK came in at -0.2% monthonmonth in January, down on December’s 0.3%, but the figure was above the -0.4% the market was expecting. 

CPI inflation rose 0.7% year-on-year in January, which is above December’s figure of 0.6% and above the consensus expectation for a reading of 0.6%. January’s upward trend was driven by rising prices of food, transport, and household goods. 

UK Retail Sales 

UK retail sales data is released this week. The latest industry data suggests February was a solid month for the UK’s retail sector, according analysis from KPMG. 

Total sales were up 1% in February on a like-for-like basis against last year’s stats. Importantly, this was a sharp reversal of January’s retail sales, where sales contracted 1.3% against 2020’s figures. 

Driving February’s growth was March’s reopening of schools across England. Spending on non-food items, like school uniforms and stationery, was up as shopper’s fell into the back-to-school trend.

Non-essential stores still remain shuttered in England and will remain so until April 12th. Online sales are benefitting greatly from lockdown, mainly because consumers have no other choice but to use digital outlets to get their non-essential items. Non-food spending accounts for 61% of February sales – up nearly double compared with 31% in February 2020. 

However, overall consumer spending is down, Barclaycard reports, slipping 13.8% y-o-y in February. Lockdown restrictions on hospitality and leisure continue to weigh heavy. No doubt they’ll surge once full lockdown restrictions are removed in June, but until then the sector is going to greatly underperform. 

US, UK, EU PMI 

PMI data is released in major economies this week as the UK, US, and EU share index findings. 

Starting with the UK, observers will be hoping the momentum started in February will continue into March. The IHS Markit/CIPS Composite PMI gave a reading of 49.6 for February, up from an eight-month low of 41.2 in January.  

Some industries are performing above expectation. According to IHS Markit, UK construction was perkier than forecast in February, with the construction PMI at 53.3 from 49.2, as projects halted by Covid-19 were given the green light to continue or begin. Manufacturing continued an upward swing too, rising to 55.1 last month. 

However, services remain disappointing, with the revised February figure chalked up as 49.5 – still below the 50 growth threshold. This is perhaps to be expected. Leisure and hospitality are still heavily restricted, so don’t expect any upward trends in March. 

EU leaders were breathing a little easier after  February’s numbers.  For instance, manufacturing was up to 57.9 in February from 54.8 in January – a 3-year high – led by strong performance from The Netherlands and Germany. 

However, since then the outlook for Europe has deteriorated as Covid cases in France and Germany have spiraled and Italy has entered a fresh lockdown. Survey data may not reflect the recent developments fully. 

Hopping across the Atlantic, the US enjoyed a smash-hit manufacturing PMI in February, blowing the EU’s impressive numbers out the water. The US manufacturing PMI came in at 60.8 – the highest level seen for 3 years. However, that impressive figure may be cooled by issues in the supply chain.  

According to manufacturers surveyed by the Institute for Supply Management (ISM), commodities and component prices are rising. The steel price is up, for instance, which massively affects pricing for the US manufacturing sector. 

US GDP 

The final reading for US Q4 2020 GDP comes this week but all eyes are really on the updated forecasts we are getting for 2021. Last week the Federal Reserve raised its outlook for growth to 6.5% this year, up from 4.2% expected at the time of the December meeting.  

The OECD and several investment banks have also upped their guidance for US growth this year. Therefore, high frequency data like the weekly unemployment claims and personal income and spending figures will be the ones to watch, particularly as the arrival of $1,400 stimulus cheques begins to be felt. 

Markets, however, like to look forward, not backward. Q1 2021’s GDP figures will be very interesting for the market. On that front, the outlook is optimistic. 

Back in December, Goldman upgraded its Q1 2021 GDP figure to 5%, following the passing of $900bn in stimulus. Joe Biden’s further $1.9bn stimulus package has been passed, which may influence the quarter’s GDP movement. 

More recently, the Philadelphia Fed has put Q1 2021 GDP growth at 3.2%, citing a brighter outlook for labour markets, although it has also bumped its inflation expectations up to 2.5% for this quarter’s CPI release. The Atlanta Fed is even more upbeat than its cousin to the north. Its initial Nowcast puts the quarter’s GDP growth at 5.2% – in line with Goldman’s December estimate.  

The point about unemployment raised by Philadelphia is pertinent here. The last Nonfarm payrolls indicated the jobs market was beginning to come off life support, surging 379,000. More people at work suggests more productivity, suggests healthy Q1 GDP growth. 

Essentially, we’re looking at a healthier US economy in 2021 so far. Morgan Stanley has even gone so far as to suggest pre-pandemic GDP growth will kick in as early as the end of March. That might be a bit too ambitious, but it’s an indicator of increased confidence regarding the United States. 

Major economic data 

 

Date  Time (GMT)  Currency  Event 
Wed 24 Mar  7.00am  GBP  UK CPI y/y 
  8.15am  EUR  French Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  8.15am  EUR  French Flash Services PMI 
  8.30am  EUR  German Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  8.30am  EUR  German Flash Services PMI 
  9.00am  EUR  Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  9.00am  EUR  Flash Services PMI 
  9.30am  GBP  Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  9.30am  GBP  Flash Services PMI 
  1.45pm  USD  Flash Manufacturing PMI 
  1.45pm  USD  Flash Services PMI 
  2.30pm  USD  US Crude Oil Inventories 
       
Thu 25 Mar  8.30am  CHF  SNB Monetary Policy Statement 
  12.30pm  USD  Final GDP q/q 
  2.30pm  USD  US Natural Gas Inventories 
       
Fri 26 May  7.00am  GBP  Retail Sales m/m 
  9.00am  EUR  German ifo Business Climate 

 

Key earnings data 

 

Date  Company  Event 
Mon 22 Mar  Saudi Aramco  Q4 2020 Earnings 
        
Tue 23 Mar  Adobe  Q1 2021 Earnings 
   Markit  Q1 2021 Earnings 
        
Wed 24 Mar  Tencent Holdings  Q4 2020 Earnings 
   Geely Motors  Q4 2020 Earnings 
        
Thu 25 Mar  CNOOC  Q4 2020 Earnings 

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