The US Debt Ceiling: The Only Way Is Up

With Democratic lawmakers currently working to pass a multi-trillion dollar infrastructure bill, Republican senators have rediscovered their fiscal conservatism, which appeared to temporarily desert them during the Trump era. Given their minority status in both Congressional chambers, McConnell and co are relying on a tool that served them well under the Obama administration – the debt ceiling.

Republicans are demanding that Democrats reduce the scale of their planned infrastructure bill, whose price tag could be as high as $3.5 trillion. Without cooperation on that issue, Republican senators say they will refuse to cooperate on the issue of the debt ceiling. With Senate Majority Leader Schumer already ruling out the use of the reconciliation workaround, which allows for a simple majority for a bill to pass, the only path to resolution on this issue is through a normal Senate vote. This is critical, given the 60-vote requirement for regular bills to pass in the Senate – any debt ceiling resolution will require at least 10 red-state senators to break ranks and vote aye. The achievement of 60 votes is made yet more difficult by the potential for moderate Democrats to join their Republican colleagues in blocking action on the debt ceiling, with Joe Manchin having previously expressed his discomfort with the national debt.

Secretary Yellen now says that the US is likely to hit its debt ceiling on the 18th of October, meaning the federal government will be unable to fulfil its financial obligations after this date unless the ceiling is raised or suspended. This latter point is crucial and has been somewhat muddied by Republican spin on this issue. In reality, the debt ceiling is not about new government spending at all, it is about the government’s ability to fulfil spending promises that it has already made. Such obligations include both welfare payments and the maintenance of the national debt, meaning the potential economic consequences of this saga go far beyond the passage or non-passage of Biden’s infrastructure plan.

This is not the first time that Republican lawmakers have employed such a strategy, using it in both 2011 and 2013 to extract concessions from President Obama. In both of these cases, the concessions achieved were relatively minor, and the Republicans were eventually forced to settle for a moral victory at best. On top of that, the Democrats were able to avoid the bulk of the political backlash, with only 31% of the country saying that they were to blame for the crisis in 2011. So why use such a tactic again, given that it appears on the surface to have been so unsuccessful in times past?

  • Firstly, the political landscape has shifted drastically since episodes one and two of this trilogy. President Biden is a far less formidable political adversary than his former boss, particularly with regards to charisma and control over the media narrative. McConnell will be betting that his party can do a better job of deflecting blame towards the Democrats now they don’t have to compete with Obama’s overwhelming political celebrity. This strategy already appears to be paying off, with just 16% of poll respondents blaming the Republicans for the potential default.
  • Secondly, let us not forget who the intended audience of this political stunt really is – the Republican base. Having the support of even just 31% of the country is more than enough to achieve success in US elections given their historically low turnout, especially in the midterms which are now on the horizon. Turnout will be key in 2022 and this savvy political ploy will increase Republican chances of breaking the Democratic stranglehold on Washington next year by enticing conservative voters to the polls.

With all of this being said, the actual probability of US debt default is virtually zero. This Republican routine would be much more convincing if we hadn’t seen it twice before already. Does anyone really believe that it is a coincidence that all three debt crises have come in the year prior to a midterm election? Or that lawmakers (and their donors) with combined stock portfolios in the billions would seriously allow the devastating economic damage such a default would guarantee? The final nail in the coffin for the convincingness of such a threat is the Republican voters themselves. One of the best-kept secrets in Washington is that red states receive far more in net federal spending per capita than blue states. Whilst conservative voters may love the idea of national fiscal responsibility in theory, they are far more attached to personal financial solvency in practice. If the Republicans actually allowed this debacle to get to a point where the government stopped sending welfare checks, it would be their voters who would suffer the most, and the potential political benefits of this gambit would be nowhere to be seen.

This is not to say that no economic damage will be done or that no panic will occur. In 2011 a resolution was agreed just two days before the debt ceiling was due to be reached and resulted in a US credit rating downgrade and the loss of 1.2 million jobs by 2015. Rather, the very worst fears of the financial markets will not be realised – the debt ceiling will be raised and the infrastructure bill will pass in one form or another. But it’s going to get very messy and very noisy before we get there.

Outcomes:

  1. The panic and political manoeuvring will continue, and may even stretch beyond the October 18th date stated by Yellen, if the Treasury gets creative with their accounting. This uncertainty will hit markets and the real economy but this is a sacrifice Republicans are willing to make. McConnell looks set to trade a few points in the S&P 500 for a few points at the polls in the midterms – a bit of a bargain in political terms.
  2. Moderate Democrats will use this pressure as leverage against the left in their own party who are pushing for the headline $3.5 trillion bill to be realised. This will lead to further infighting among the Democrats which the left will likely lose, meaning a smaller infrastructure package than initially intended.
  3. The chances of the Democrats maintaining or expanding their control in Washington just went down.

Wochenausblick: OPEC trifft sich und FOMC veröffentlicht Sitzungsprotokolle

In unserem ersten Wochenausblick des Jahres schauen wir uns ein paar besonders saftige Themen an. OPEC+ beginnt am 4. Januar mit dem ersten der neuen monatlichen Ministertreffen diesen Jahres, während die Produzenten über das schrittweise Zurückfahren der Fördereinschnitte diskutieren.

Die FOMC gibt ihre jüngsten Sitzungsprotokolle heraus – werden sie eine Roadmap der Erholung der US-Wirtschaft darstellen? Außerdem werden die US-Beschäftigungszahlen veröffentlicht, die Anzeichen von Stärke im US-Arbeitsmarkt zeigen könnten.

OPEC-Treffen 

Das erste einer neuen Reihe monatlicher Treffen von OPEC- und Nicht-OPEC-Ministern gibt diese Woche den Anstoß, nachdem im Dezember beschlossen wurde, den im letzten Jahr vereinbarten schrittweisen Prozess der Fördereinschnitte zu verzögern, um die Preise zu stützen.

Das ist der Monat in dem die OPEC-Mitglieder und ihre Verbündeten die Förderstopps leicht zurückfahren und die Produktion wieder anheben werden. OPEC+ hat grünes Licht für die Förderung von 500.000 Barrel pro Tag zusätzlich von Januar bis mindestens März gegeben. Der gesamte Produktionseinschnitt für Januar wird 7,2 Millionen Barrel pro Tag betragen, verglichen mit dem Einschnitt von 7,7 Millionen Barrel pro Tag gegen Ende 2020.

Die Nachfrageerwartungen haben sich jedoch trotz Impfstoffs nicht verbessert, sodass der Druck auf die OPEC bestehen bleibt, die Situation genau im Auge zu behalten. Die OPEC geht jetzt davon aus, dass die weltweite Öl-Nachfrage 2020 um 9,77 Millionen Barrel pro Tag auf 89,99 Millionen Barrel pro Tag gesunken ist, im Vergleich zu noch 90 Millionen Barrel pro Tag in den Schätzungen vom November.

Die Öl-Nachfrage für 2021 wird jetzt auf 95,89 Millionen Barrel pro Tag geschätzt. Das sind 410.000 weniger als die ursprüngliche OPEC-Schätzung, die im November im MOMR erschienen ist, prognostizierte hatte. Im Oktober hatte die OPEC geschätzt, dass die Ölnachfrage 2021 bei 96,8 Millionen Barrel pro Tag liegen wird.

Ein Schlüsselaspekt bei der Abwägung von Preis gegen Nachfrage gegen Produktion wird die Mitwirkung der Mitglieder und Verbündeten sein. Es gab bereits Meinungsverschiedenheiten in den Rängen, so überlegt Saudi-Arabien zum Beispiel seinen Vorsitz aufzugeben. Einige Produzenten in der Einflusssphäre der OPEC halten beharrlich an ihren eigenen Produktionszielen fest, unabhängig von Einschränkungen oder Förderstopps.

Libyen hat Pläne zur Steigerung seiner Ölproduktion bekannt gegeben und zuvor erklärt, dass es keine Fördereinschnitte akzeptieren wird, bis die Fördermenge verlässlich bei 1,7 Millionen Barrel pro Tag liegt – verglichen mit derzeit 1,108 Millionen Barrel pro Tag.

Auch der Iran hat versprochen 2021 seine Ölproduktion auf 2,3 Millionen Barrel pro Tag hochzufahren, von jetzt 1,986 Millionen Barrel pro Tag.

FOMC Sitzungsprotokolle 

Die Protokolle der letzten Fed-Sitzung stehen an und werden einen deutlicher Hinweis auf mögliche Meinungsverschiedenheiten geben, inwieweit das FOMC der Ansicht ist, dass es die langfristigen Zinssätze verankern muss und ob weitere politische Unterstützung erforderlich ist. Die Themen der Fed beginnen sich Richtung Reflationshandel und steigender langfristiger Zinsen zu drehen.

Steigende Inflationserwartungen könnten ein Problem für die Fed sein, da sie sie früher als erwartet zum Handeln zwingen könnte. Während das durchschnittliche Inflationsziel einen gewissen Spielraum bietet, werden wir genau darauf achten, ob einzelne politische Entscheidungsträger beginnen sich über die Inflation und die Notwendigkeit einer stärkeren Zurückhaltung in der Geldpolitik Sorgen zu machen.

US-Beschäftigungszahlen außerhalb der Landwirtschaft 

Der Jobbericht vom Dezember schließt die Woche am Freitag ab, wobei steigende Covid-Fallzahlen in den USA die Nachfrage wahrscheinlich belasten werden, obwohl saisonale Anstellungen ein zu berücksichtigender Faktor sein werden. Im November wurden weitere 245.000 Arbeitsplätze zur US-Wirtschaft hinzugefügt, während die Arbeitslosenquote auf 6,7% fiel. Das lag deutlich unter der Laufrate der vergangenen 6 Monate und deutet auf eine Verlangsamung der Neuanstellungen hin, die durch steigende Fallzahlen im ganzen Land bedingt ist.

Die Märkte scheinen jedoch weitgehend glücklich zu sein, über eine schwächere Erholung des Arbeitsmarktes dank des Impfstoffes hinweg zu sehen. Der Bericht vom Dezember ist jedoch rückwärtsgerichtet und wird steigende Fallzahlen und neue Lockdown-Regelungen in mehreren Bundesstaaten widerspiegeln. Darüber hinaus unterstreichen schwache Arbeitsmarktzahlen nur die Notwendigkeit anhaltender finanzieller und steuerlicher Unterstützung – wir befinden uns in einer schlechte Nachrichten sind gute Nachrichten Phase.

Georgia Runoffs 

Die Wähler werden am 5. Januar an die Wahlurnen im Georgia Runoffs gehen, um die Kontrolle über den Senat für die ersten zwei Jahre der Präsidentschaft von Joe Biden zu bestimmen.

Das wird überaus wichtig sein, da ein blauer Senat eine einfachere Ausführung von Bidens Agenda bedeuten sollte, die auf grüne Energien und Investitionen gerichtet ist. Allerdings scheinen die Chancen für eine dünne republikanische Mehrheit ziemlich gut, trotz des dünnen demokratischen Sieges bei den Präsidentschaftswahlen im November, was weniger regulatorischen und steuerlichen Überhang bedeuten könnte.

Ausblick 2021 Webinar 

Dienstag, 5. Januar, 13:00 CET 

Möchten Sie wissen, was die wichtigsten Themen der Märkte im neuen Jahr sein werden? In diesem Webinar stellen wir uns die großen Fragen: Wird Inflation der Hund sein, der endlich bellt? Wird der britische Aktienmarkt endlich aufholen? Werden Impfstoffe eine Rückkehr zur einer normalen Konjunktur-Umgebung einleiten? Schließen Sie sich unserem Chef-Marktanalytiker Neil Wilson an, um die Antworten auf die großen Fragen zu erhalten, in unserem Ausblick für 2021.

Melden Sie sich an

Top Wirtschafts-Daten der Woche

Date  Time (GMT)  Currency  Event 
Mon Jan 4th  9.00am  EUR  Final Manufacturing PMI 
       
  9.30am  GBP  Final Manufacturing PMI 
       
  All Day  All  OPEC-JMMC Meeting 
       
  2.30pm  CAD  Manufacturing PMI 
       
  3.00pm  USD  ISM Manufacturing PMI 
       
Tue Jan 5th  9.30am  GBP  Construction PMI 
       
Wed Jan 6th  9.00am  EUR  Final Services PMI 
       
  9.30am  GBP  Final Services PMI 
       
  1.15pm  USD  ADP Nonfarm Employment Change 
       
  3.00pm  USD  ISM Services PMI 
       
  3.30pm  USD  US Crude Oil Inventories 
       
  7.00pm  USD  FOMC Meeting Minutes 
       
Thu Jan 7th  10.00am  EUR  CPI Flash Estimate 
       
  10.00am  EUR  Core CPI Flash Estimate 
       
  1.30pm  USD  Unemployment Changes 
       
  3.30pm  USD  US Natural Gas Inventories 
       
Fri Jan 8th  1.30am  CNH  CPI y/y 
       
  1.30am  CNH  PPI y/y 
       
  1.30pm  CAD  Employment Change 
       
  1.30pm  CAD  Unemployment Rate 
       
  1.30pm  USD  Average Hourly Earnings m/m 
       
  1.30pm  USD  Nonfarm Employment Change 
       
  1.30pm  USD  Unemployment Rate 
       
  3.00pm  CAD  Ivey PMI 

 

Top Geschäftsberichte diese Woche

Date  Company  Event 
Mon Jan 4th  State Street Corp.  Q4 2021 Earnings 
     
Wed Jan 6th  RPM International  Q2 2021 Earnings 
     
Thu Jan 7th  Micron Technology  Q1 2021 Earnings 
     
  Constellation Brands  Q3 2021 Earnings 
     
  Walgreens Boots Alliance  Q1 2021 Earnings 
     
  ConAgra Foods  Q2 2021 Earnings 
     
  Lamb Weston Holdings  Q2 2021 Earnings 
     
Fri Jan 8th  Tata Consultancy Services  Q3 2021 Earnings 

Week Ahead: OPEC meets & FOMC releases minutes

In our first week ahead of the year, we’re checking out some particularly meaty topics. OPEC+ begins the first of this year’s new monthly ministerial meetings on Jan 4th as producers discuss gradually unwinding production cuts.  

The FOMC releases its latest meeting minutes – will they be a roadmap for US economic recovery? Plus, US nonfarm payrolls are released, which could show signs of strength in the United States’ job market. 

OPEC meeting 

The first of a new series of monthly meetings of OPEC and non-OPEC ministers kicks of this week, following on from December’s decision to delay the process of tapering production cuts agreed last year to prop up prices. 

This is the month where OPEC members plus allies will ease the stoppers slightly and increase production. OPEC+ has given the greenlight to pump an extra 500,000bpd from January until at least March. The total production cut for January will be 7.2m bpd compared to the 7.7m bpd cut in the latter part of 2020. 

However, demand expectations have failed to improve despite vaccines so pressure will remain on OPEC to monitor the situation closely. OPEC now expects global oil demand to have fallen to 9.77 million barrels per day in 2020 to reach 89.99m bpd, compared to over 90m bpd in its November estimations.  

2021 oil demand is now forecast at 95.89m bpd. That’s down 410,000 from the original OPEC projections published in the November MOMR. In October, OPEC had estimated 2021 oil demand to be 96.8m bpd. 

One key aspect of balancing price vs demand vs production will be member and ally compliance. There has already been a bit of dissention within the ranks, with likes of Saudi Arabia considering giving up its chairman position, for instance. Some producers within OPEC’s sphere of influence are steadfastly sticking to their own production targets, regardless of limits and stops. 

Libya has voiced its plans to increase its oil production and has previously stated that it will not accept any production quota until such a point where it can reliably produce 1.7 million bpd—compared to its current 1.108 million bpd. 

Iran, too, has promised to increase its oil production to 2.3 million bpd in 2021, up from 1.986 million bpd now. 

FOMC Meeting Minutes 

Minutes from the latest Fed meeting are on tap – giving a clearer indication of possible dissension over the extent to which the FOMC feels it needs to anchor long-term rates and whether further policy support is required. The question for the Fed is starting to pivot towards the reflation trade and rising long-term rates. 

Rising inflation expectations may be a problem for the Fed as it could force it into tightening sooner than previously expected. Whilst average inflation targeting gives it some leeway, we’ll be paying close to attention to whether individual policymakers are starting to fret over inflation and the need for more restraint in monetary policy.  

Nonfarm Payrolls 

The December jobs report caps off the week on Friday with surging Covid cases in the US likely to weigh on demand, albeit seasonal hiring will be a factor to considerIn November, a further 245,000 jobs were added to the US economy, whilst the unemployment rate edged down to 6.7%. This was well below the run rate of the last 6 months and indicated a slowing in hiring as case counts rose across the country. 

However, markets seem to be largely happy to overlook a softer pace of recovery in the jobs market though thanks to vaccines – December’s report is backwards-looking and will reflect surging case numbers and new lockdown restrictions across multiple states. Moreover, soft jobs numbers only underline the need for sustained monetary and fiscal stimulus – we’re in a bad news is good news phase. 

Georgia Runoffs 

Voters will go to the polls for the Georgia Runoffs on January 5th in an election that will decide control of the Senate for the first two years of Joe Biden’s presidency. 

This will be exceptionally important, as a Blue Senate should mean easier passage of Biden’s agenda, which is pointed towards green energy and investment. However, the chances of a slim Republican majority seem pretty gooddespite November’s slim Democrat victory in the presidential elections, which would mean less regulatory and tax overhang. 

Outlook 2021 webinar 

Tuesday 5th January, 12.00 GMT 

Want to know what the key market topics will be in the new year? We’re asking the big questions with this webinar: Will inflation be the dog that finally barks? Will the UK stock market finally catch up? Will vaccines spur a reflationary return to normal environment? Join chief market analyst Neil Wilson to get the answers to the big questions in our 2021 Outlook. 

Sign up 

Major economic data 

Date  Time (GMT)  Currency  Event 
Mon Jan 4th  9.00am  EUR  Final Manufacturing PMI 
       
  9.30am  GBP  Final Manufacturing PMI 
       
  All Day  All  OPEC-JMMC Meeting 
       
  2.30pm  CAD  Manufacturing PMI 
       
  3.00pm  USD  ISM Manufacturing PMI 
       
Tue Jan 5th  9.30am  GBP  Construction PMI 
       
Wed Jan 6th  9.00am  EUR  Final Services PMI 
       
  9.30am  GBP  Final Services PMI 
       
  1.15pm  USD  ADP Nonfarm Employment Change 
       
  3.00pm  USD  ISM Services PMI 
       
  3.30pm  USD  US Crude Oil Inventories 
       
  7.00pm  USD  FOMC Meeting Minutes 
       
Thu Jan 7th  10.00am  EUR  CPI Flash Estimate 
       
  10.00am  EUR  Core CPI Flash Estimate 
       
  1.30pm  USD  Unemployment Changes 
       
  3.30pm  USD  US Natural Gas Inventories 
       
Fri Jan 8th  1.30am  CNH  CPI y/y 
       
  1.30am  CNH  PPI y/y 
       
  1.30pm  CAD  Employment Change 
       
  1.30pm  CAD  Unemployment Rate 
       
  1.30pm  USD  Average Hourly Earnings m/m 
       
  1.30pm  USD  Nonfarm Employment Change 
       
  1.30pm  USD  Unemployment Rate 
       
  3.00pm  CAD  Ivey PMI 

 

Key earnings data 

Date  Company  Event 
Mon Jan 4th  State Street Corp.  Q4 2021 Earnings 
     
Wed Jan 6th  RPM International  Q2 2021 Earnings 
     
Thu Jan 7th  Micron Technology  Q1 2021 Earnings 
     
  Constellation Brands  Q3 2021 Earnings 
     
  Walgreens Boots Alliance  Q1 2021 Earnings 
     
  ConAgra Foods  Q2 2021 Earnings 
     
  Lamb Weston Holdings  Q2 2021 Earnings 
     
Fri Jan 8th  Tata Consultancy Services  Q3 2021 Earnings 

CySEC (Europa)

Produkte

  • CFD
  • Aktienhandel
  • Strategy Builder

  • Kundengelder werden in getrennten Bankkonten geführt
  • FSCS-Anlegerentschädigung bis zu 20.000 EUR
  • Versicherung mit 1.000.000 € Deckungsbetrag**
  • Schutz vor Negativsaldo

Markets.com, betrieben von Safecap Investments Limited („Safecap“) Reguliert von der CySEC unter der Lizenznummer 092/08 und von der FSCA unter Lizenznummer 43906.

FSC (Weltweit)

Produkte

  • CFD
  • Strategy Builder

  • Kundengelder werden in getrennten Bankkonten geführt
  • Elektronische Bestätigung
  • Schutz vor Negativsaldo
  • Versicherung mit 1.000.000 $ Deckungsbetrag**

Markets.com, betrieben von Finalto (BVI) Limited („Finalto BVI”) Besitzt eine Lizenz der B.V.I Financial Services Commission („FSC“) mit der Lizenznummer SIBA/L/14/1067.

FCA (Britische)

Produkte

  • CFD
  • Spread-Wetten
  • Strategy Builder

  • Kundengelder werden in getrennten Bankkonten geführt
  • FSCS-Anlegerentschädigung von bis zu 85.000 GDP. *Abhängig von Kriterien und Teilnahmeberechtigung
  • Versicherung mit 1.000.000 £ Deckungsbetrag**
  • Schutz vor Negativsaldo

Markets.com, betrieben von Finalto Trading Limited Reguliert von der Financial Conduct Authority („FCA“) unter der Lizenznummer 607305.

ASIC (Australien)

Produkte

  • CFD

  • Kundengelder werden in getrennten Bankkonten geführt
  • Elektronische Bestätigung
  • Schutz vor Negativsaldo
  • Versicherung mit 1.000.000 $ Deckungsbetrag**

Markets.com, betrieben von Finalto (Australia) Pty Limited Hat bei den Australian Financial Services die Lizenznummer 424008 und wird von der Australian Securities and Investments Commission („ASIC“) reguliert”).

Nach der Auswahl einer dieser Regulierungsstellen werden die entsprechenden Informationen auf der gesamten Website angezeigt. Wenn Sie möchten, dass die Informationen einer anderen Regulierungsstelle angezeigt werden, wählen Sie diese bitte aus. Für weitere Informationen bitte hier klicken.

**Es gelten Allgemeine Geschäftsbedingungen. Siehe Police zu weiteren Einzelheiten.

Haben Sie sich verlaufen?

Uns ist aufgefallen, dass Sie sich auf der Website für befinden. Da Sie die Verbindung von einem Standort in der aus herstellen, sollten Sie in Betracht ziehen, wieder zur Domain zu wechseln, für die die -Produktinterventionsmaßnahmen gelten. Es steht Ihnen zwar frei, sich ganz aus eigener Initiative hier umzusehen, aber wenn Sie die Website für Ihr Land aufrufen, werden die entsprechenden Regulierungsinformationen und relevanten Schutzmaßnahmen des gewählten Unternehmens angezeigt. Möchten Sie zu weitergeleitet werden?